Pacific Union College HomePitcairn Islands Study Center Home
Study Center Bligh & Bounty Pitcairn Island Norfolk Island PUC Library

The Study Center  

Center Resources  

Collections  

Cruise Ship Schedule  

Book Recommendations  

Links  

News  

Bligh & Bounty  

Pitcairn Island  

Norfolk Island  

Study Center Home

Center Store  

Contact Us  

Site Map  

 

Transportation to Pitcairn Island

Saga Holidays big cruise ship Saga Rose dwarfs the small Pitcairn longboat O'Leary lying alongside the ship deck during the vessel's call at Pitcairn Island in 1998

There is no air service to Pitcairn Island. The closest one can get to Pitcairn by air is an airstrip on the island of Mangareva in the Gambier Islands group, which is located some 900 miles southeast of Tahiti and more than 300 miles from Pitcairn.

In the mid-to-late 1900s, about the only way one could get to Pitcairn Island, save by private boat or yacht, was to find a commercial ship from either Wellington or Auckland in New Zealand whose captain was willing to drop his passenger off at Pitcairn Island. For several decades the personnel of the Pitcairn Commissioner's office in Auckland were most helpful in finding such shipping for those desiring to visit the Island.

Not long after the 21st century began, a ship of the Stoney Creek Shipping Company (of New Zealand) began ferrying people on an irregular basis from the airstrip at Mangareva to Pitcairn. Before the end of the first decade of the new century at least one other vessel was making irregular passenger voyages to the Island.

Today, there is a regularly scheduled shipping service to Pitcairn from the airstrip at Mangareva. The passenger-cargo ship Claymore II originates a schedule each quarter that begins in the vessel's home port of Tauranga, New Zealand and voyages to Pitcairn Island with both passengers and cargo for the Island. Then through the quarter Claymore II voyages back and forth from Pitcairn to Mangareva, picking up passengers at Mangareva for Pitcairn. At the end of the quarter Claymore II travels back to New Zealand to receive new cargo for Pitcairn, and then begins its quarterly voyaging schedule again.

Here is the passenger ship service schedule to Pitcairn Island.

February / March 2017
First Rotation
Depart Mangareva 14th Feb
Arrive Pitcairn 16th Feb
Depart Pitcairn 19th Feb
Arrive Mangareva 21st Feb
Second Rotation
Depart Mangareva 21st Feb
Arrive Pitcairn 23rd Feb
Depart Pitcairn 26th Feb
Arrive Mangareva 28th Feb
Third Rotation
Depart Mangareva 28th Feb
Arrive Pitcairn 2nd March
Depart Pitcairn 5th March
Arrive Mangareva 7th March

 

August / September 2017
First Rotation
Depart Mangareva 15th Aug
Arrive Pitcairn 17th Aug
Depart Pitcairn 20th Aug
Arrive Mangareva 22 Aug
Second Rotation
Depart Mangareva 22nd Aug
Arrive Pitcairn 24th Aug
Depart Pitcairn 27th Aug
Arrive Mangareva 29th Aug
Third Rotation
Depart Mangareva 29th Aug
Arrive Pitcairn 31st Aug
Depart Pitcairn 3rd Sept
Arrive Mangareva 5th Sept
May / June 2017
First Rotation
Depart Mangareva 16th May
Arrive Pitcairn 18th May
Depart Pitcairn 21st May
Arrive Mangareva 23rd May
Second Rotation
Depart Mangareva 23rd May
Arrive Pitcairn 25th May
Depart Pitcairn 28th May
Arrive Mangareva 30th May
Third Rotation
Depart Mangareva 30th May
Arrive Pitcairn 1st June
Depart Pitcairn 4th June
Arrive Mangareva 6th June

 

November / December 2017
First Rotation
Depart Mangareva 14th Nov
Arrive Pitcairn 16th Nov
Depart Pitcairn 19th Nov
Arrive Mangareva 21st Nov
Second Rotation
Depart Mangareva 21st Nov
Arrive Pitcairn 23rd Nov
Depart Pitcairn 26th Nov
Arrive Mangareva 28th Nov
Third Rotation
Depart Mangareva 28th Nov
Arrive Pitcairn 30th Nov
Depart Pitcairn 3rd Dec
Arrive Mangareva 5th Dec

Disclaimer: MV Claymore II - At time of publication these schedules are correct. However, they are subject to change so please contact Pitcairn Island Tourism before making bookings.

An additional travel service, Pitcairn Travel, offers voyages to the Island. The current schedule of this service may be seen at www.pitcairntravel.pn.

Places To Stay on Pitcairn

Check out these friendly places to stay at VisitPitcairn.pn

In addition, many people visit Pitcairn Island, usually for a few hours rather than for days or weeks, by way of a number of large cruise ships that call at the Island during what is known locally as "cruise ship season."

Cruise Ship Schedule

Here is a listing of cruise ships that are scheduled to call at Pitcairn Island in the future:

Updated: January 12, 2017

Sea Princess

MV Sea Princess

August 19, 2017
Passengers: 1,950
Crew: 900
Length: 856 feet – 261 meters
Tonnage: 77,499
Launched: 1988
Princess Cruises

Le Boreal

MS Le Boreal

November 3,4, 2017
Passengers: 264
Crew: 110
Length: 466 feet – 142.1 meters
Tonnage: 10,944 GRT
Launched: 2010
Ponant Cruises

Caledonia Sky

MV Caledonian Sky

November 26, 2017
Passengers: 114
Crew: 70
Length: 90.6 meters
Tonnage: 4,200
Launched: 1991
Zegrahm Expeditions

AIDAcara

MV AIDAcara

December 3, 2017
Passengers: 1,230
Crew: 360
Length: 634.2 feet – 193.3 meters
Tonnage: 38,531
Launched: 1996
AIDA Cruises

Crystal Symphony

MV Crystal Symphony

March 26, 2018
Passengers: 922
Crew: 545
Length: 781 feet – 232 meters
Tonnage: 51,044 GRT
Launched: 1995
Crystal Cruises

Marina

MV Marina

March 27, 2018
Passengers: 1,252
Crew: 780
Length: 782 feet – 238 meters
Tonnage: 66,000 GRT
Launched: 2010
Oceanic Cruises

Silver Explorer

MV Silver Explorer

October 21, 2018
Passengers: 130
Crew: 117
Length 354 feet – 108 meters
Tonnage: 6,130 GRT
Launched: 1989
Silver Sea Cruises

Bremen

MS Bremen

December 4, 2018
Passengers: 164
Crew: 100
Length: 365 feet – 111.51 meters
Tonnage: 6,752 GRT
Launched: 1990
Hapag Lloyd Cruises

Europa

MS Europa

January 17, 2019
Passengers: 408
Crew: 275
Length: 651 feet – 198.6 meters
Tonnage: 28,890 GRT
Launched: 1999
Hapag Lloyd Cruises

Albatros

MS Albatros

January 24, 2019
Passengers: 812
Crew: 537
Length: 674 feet – 205.4 meters
Tonnage: 28,518 GRT
Launched: 1973
Phoenix Reasin Cruises

Crystal Symphony

MV Crystal Symphony

February 27, 2019
Passengers: 922
Crew: 545
Length: 781 feet – 232 meters
Tonnage: 51,044 GRT
Launched: 1995
Crystal Cruises

The Ships That Call at Pitcairn

With each vessel that calls at Pitcairn Island, whether it be a huge, multi-decked “ro-ro” (roll-on, roll-off) ship carrying hundreds of automobiles, a small sailing yacht, or a thousand-passenger cruise ship, there is always interest, even excitement among the Pitcairn people about it – a visitor has come!  And the questions begin: “What port or country is this ship coming from?” “What is its cargo?” “Who is the captain or skipper?” “What place is she bound for?” “Is there a chance we can offer island crafts and products for sale on board the ship?” “Will the captain allow his passengers to come ashore for an island visit?” “Are there surplus products for sale on board the ship?” “Is this the first of a number of calls the ship will be making at Pitcairn, or is this a ‘one-time-only’ call?” . . . the questions are many and the answer to each one is important to the survival of Pitcairn Island.

Pitcairn Shipping List



A Pitcairn longboat braves rough seas to make contact with a ship calling at the Island.

Except for cruise ships, few of the vessels that call at Pitcairn Island are known to the Pitcairners for more than a few hours (by radio) before their appearance off Bounty Bay, the landing place of the Island.  The calling ships may be from almost any country of the world, and are of almost every type vessel that floats: sailing yachts, container ships, sea-going tugs, tramp steamers, French naval vessels, roll-on roll-of auto carriers, banana boats, bulk carriers, heavy-lift ships, fishing boats … In years past a careful record of each ship calling at Pitcairn was kept on the Island.  Today all ship calls at Pitcairn are still faithfully recorded and made may be found in the columns of the Pitcairn Miscellany, the Island’s monthly newspaper.  Two books listing all ship calls at Pitcairn, going back to the arrival of the Bounty mutineers there in 1790, are available from the Pitcairn Islands Study Center: “Pitcairn – Port of Call” (calls from 1790 to 1990), and “Pitcairn Island as a Port of Call” (calls from 1790 to 2010).

Year 2016

January 4

Nippon Yusen Kaisha’s 50,142-ton cruise ship Asuka II (ex-Crystal Hamony), with a 960-passenger, 545-crew capacity, calls at Pitcairn, but only “until a few boxes of provisions could be exchanged before steaming on her way.  The lack of selling-trading opportunity as this ship sails away is a significant economic loss to the Island:  “Under conditions that, for us, would have been thought to be ‘a piece of cake,’ the Asuka II’s’ master, here on his first voyage to Pitcairn, considered the conditions too dangerous,” reports the Pitcairn Miscellany newspaper.  “Consequently . . . the disappointment on our part was palpable. For a community whose place on the planet is the very definition of remoteness, losing the visit of a cruise ship hurts in more ways than one.  We love to see and meet new faces.  For us, going out to a cruise ship is like a trip to another city for everyone else.  And being people of the sea, we love ships.  Some of our people know much about the calling ships as shipbuilders themselves.  We love looking at and touching ships!  But, most significantly, a good portion of each family’s annual income sails away with every vessel that cancels a stop.  In a number of ways, remote living implies a necessity of taking risks, risks that we willingly accept.  For the most part, we come out ‘way ahead of the game.  But there are times when we roll the dice, and lose, as we did on January 4th.  It’s a gamble that we hate to lose, though, once arriving safely back at shore, we can always say that we beat Captain Nemo again.  And that’s a win!”

January 18

Oceania Cruises’ cruise ship Marina, 66,000 tons, with 1,252 passenger and 780 crew capacity, calls at Pitcairn Island on one of her twice yearly visits.  “Marina is one of our favorite visitors,” reports an islander.  “Some might think us odd, as we always look forward to a burger from the grill on the ship’s Lido Deck each time she visits.  Well, hey, we don’t have fast food joints on Pitcairn, after all!”

January 25

Silversea Cruises’ cruise ship Silver Whisper, 28,258 tons, with a 382-passenger, 302-crew capacity, calls at Pitcairn Island “in conditions that allowed 90 of the ship’s passengers to land on the Island.  Silver Whisper calls just two days after the Pitcairn islanders celebrated the 227th anniversary of the mutiny on H.M.S. Bounty, the event that ultimately brought Pitcairn Island to fame.  Each January 23, except when it falls on their Saturday Sabbath day of worship, or a storm forbids, the Pitcairners celebrate “Bounty Day,” marking the January day in 1790 when it is believed the ship Bounty was burned in Bounty Bay.  One of the highlights of the holiday is the burning of a small replica of the Bounty just off The Landing at the Island.

Commenting on the modern contrast to the conditions that surrounded the Bounty mutineers’ settlement of Pitcairn in 1790, the Pitcairn Miscellany newspaper notes: “Whereas the Bounty settlers may have lived in fear of discovery, today we find ourselves in an entirely different predicament, for our very survival depends on being re-discovered by new settlers.  The majority of our people have moved away, preferring to live in that dog-eat-dog hostile world ‘outside.’  They moan about being homesick for Pitcairn, but few make the effort to come back even for a visit.  And so in a new era, we look to ‘outsiders’ to come and build up the Pitcairn population.  In order for us to continue, we need people to come and live here, or in short order the saga that began 227 years ago with the Bountymutiny in 1789, will be finally, and assuredly, over.  Thinking of moving?  Check this out: http://www.immigration.gov.pn

February 15

Norwegian sail-training ship Sorlandet, 499 tons, calls with 14 students, seven teachers, and 20 crew members on board.  During her three-day visit to Pitcairn, Sorlandet’s complement puts on a concert in the Square.  The program is filled with poetry, music, a parody of life on board the ship, action songs, and lessons in the Norwegian language.  To reciprocate, the Island’s police officer, Terry, and his wife, May, perform Maori songs, and May demonstrates poi twirling.  The evening closes with the community singing the old favorite, “In the Sweet By and By.”

February 18

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II arrives from Mangareva, Gambier Islands, with 19 visitors to Pitcairn.  The vessel departs Pitcairn on February 21, taking 11 visitors from the Island.

February 21

Sailing vessel Let’s Go calls, spending an adventure-filled day on Pitcairn Island.

February 25

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II calls, from Mangareva.  She departs Pitcairn on February 28.

February 28

Sailing yacht Rangiroa calls at Pitcairn Island with a two-member crew.  She sails from the Island on February 29.

Sailing yacht Yum Yum calls at the Island with a crew of two.  On February 29, Yum Yumdeparts Pitcairn for French Polynesia.

March 3

Sailing yacht Hildegard Hansen,with a single sailor aboard, calls at Pitcairn Island for a three- day visit, before departing for an undisclosed destination.

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II arrives at Pitcairn from Mangareva, Gambier Islands, with four visitors aboard.  She departs for Ile de Gambier on March 6, taking six visitors from the Island.

March 22

Phoenix Reisen’s cruise ship Albatross(ex-Royal Viking Sea, ex-Royal Odyssey, ex-Norwegian Star, and ex-Crown), 28,518 tons, calls at Pitcairn Island.  During the transfer of islander carvings that were to slated to be sold on the ship, a box of Len Brown’s skillfully carved turtles was knocked into the sea.  Later, after the selling of other crafts on the ship, Pitcairners Andrew, Brenda, and Shawn Christian, and David Brown, swim to the place in the ocean where the turtles are spotted and still floating, and retrieve them.

March 24

Sailing yacht Sparrow arrives at Pitcairn Island with a crew of three.  She departs the Island later on the same day of her arrival.

Sailing yacht Karma Waters calls at the island with two crew members aboard.  Karma Waters departs Pitcairn on March 24.

April 8

(A yacht with two French nationals arrives at Pitcairn Island on Friday, April 8, and make radio contact with the Island.  The yacht’s crew decides not to land because of the landing fee costs; however, it anchors offshore overnight.  On April 9 the two crew members swim ashore without anyone knowing.  They are seen by islanders and spoken to; however, they leave the island and swim back to their yacht without being processed by immigration.  The yacht is found to be named L’Envol and the crew from France and Estonia.

April 19

Oceania Cruises’ 66,000-ton, 782-foot long cruise ship Marina calls at Pitcairn Island on the second of her twice-yearly visits between South America and countries of the South Pacific.  This is her last voyage in the southern hemisphere for the next two years, during which time she will be cruising the northern routes and the Caribbean.

May 15

The sailing yacht Zenon, from Mangareva, bound for Mangareva, Gambier Islands, with a crew of three, calls at Pitcairn Island for a three-day visit.

The yacht Gex, from Mangareva, bound for Mangareva, calls with a crew of four aboard.  On board Zenon and Gex are a physician and a dentist, both of whom graciously give of their time to check teeth and provide medical assistance during their visit.

May 18

Sailing yacht Karma, from Easter Island, bound for Mangareva, calls at the Island with a single crew member on board.

May 19

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Mangareva, arrives at Pitcairn Island with 11 passengers on board.  When the ship departs Pitcairn for Mangareva on May 29, there are 15 passengers on board who have visited the Island.

May 22

Sailing yacht Nerthus, from the Galapagos Islands with a crew of three calls at Pitcairn Island.  The yacht departs Pitcairn on May 23, for Mangareva.

May 26

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Mangareva, bound for Ile de Gambier, brings four visitors to the Island.  On May 29, she takes eight visitors to Mangareva.

May 31

Sailing yacht Altair, from the east, bound for New Zealand.   Unable to anchor in Bounty Bay, the yacht anchors off Water Valley, and then after a brief visit ashore, sails to the west in the evening of May 31.

June 2

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Mangareva, Ile de Gambier, calls at the Island with 13 visitors, including Pitcairn Governor Jonathan Sinclair.  Also arriving on the ship are Pitcairn’s acting Administrator, the Pitcairn Islands Attorney General, the Island school teacher, and a handful of locals who had been away to Tahiti for medical reasons.  The ship departs with seven passengers on board on June 5, bound for New Zealand with a stop at Ile de Gambier on the way.

June 26

At 11 p.m., on this date, two Pitcairn Island longboats, Moss and O’Leary (also known as Tub), put out from the Island in an emergency evacuation of a seriously-ill Pitcairner, Brian Young. The Pitcairners are taking him to the closest airstrip at Mangareva, some 300 miles from Pitcairn, from which point he be airlifted to the hospital in Tahiti.  Though the aluminum Pitcairn longboats are sturdy craft, they are not built for making 300-plus-mile runs in the open sea.  Pitcairner Dave Brown describes part of the emergency voyage to Mangareva: “As the miles clocked down, the watches were changed every hour, and the two boats stayed on course for Gambier, some 200 miles away.  The wind blew hard from astern, 30-plus knots all day Friday; and as night came on, we still had about 100 miles to go.  At 0300z, I listened to the Pac Sea Net.  The world of ham radio was looking for us.  We had made worldwide news.

“Through the night, swells from astern kept the boats going at a speed of 9.5-plus knots.  The crews were getting tired from lack of sleep; but the boats kept going.  The wind eased to about 15 knots and shifted to the North.  I took the tiller from Jay (Warren) just after 4 a.m., on Saturday morning.  As the windy, wet morning broke, the Gambier Islands were visible, dead ahead.  I called out ‘land ho,’ and everyone got up to see the islands.  As we approached Mangareva, Tihotu called on the VHF, letting us know that the plane had arrived at 6 a.m., and was waiting for us on the Mangareva airstrip. 

“An official water taxi met us to take Brian and Kari (Brian’s wife) from Tub to the airport.  Passports had to be checked, so we followed the taxi back to the wharf at Rikitea, where we tied up Moss, thirty-four hours after leaving Pitcairn.  We all got on board Tub and headed across the lagoon to the airport, with Yves guiding the boat through the coral shoals.  On arriving, photos were made of the Pitcairn team, the medevac pilot, and the doctor.  We said our Goodbyes and Thank Yous.  Then the plane left for Tahiti, four hours away.  Our job was done;  now the new job was to get ourselves home.”

While the Pitcairn emergency evacuation team was on Mangareva, they twice visited the grave of Pitcairner Terry Young.  He had died not many months earlier on a yacht during a similar emergency evacuation, before the vessel could reach Mangareva.  Authorities on Mangareva would not allow his body to be returned to Pitcairn for burial.  “We visited Terry’s grave twice and on the second visit weeded the plot,” writes Dave Brown.  He describes the ending hours of the evacuation team’s return voyage to Pitcairn: 

“As night came on we had less than 40 miles to go.  Michael (Warren) had taken a portable generator and put a light up at Highest Point to guide us home.  The light shown bright in the night; and, as we neared Tedside and turned to the north to clear Matts Rocks, the lights of town came into view. 

Tub entered the harbor first, and was winched out of the water; then, it was our turn.  As we rounded the jetty after 37 hours of traveling from French Polynesia, our families and friends lined the wharf, clapping and cheering as Moss, the last of the two longboats, entered the harbor.  Torika (Warren-Peu) had organized a sign ‘Welcome Home Pitkern Heros.’  There was a lot of hugging and handshakes, and many said, ‘Well-done!’  We took just a few things out of the boats before heading home for a hot shower and meal.  The next day we emptied the boats, put things away, and went home for more sleep.

“Thanks to everyone on Pitcairn, the Pacific Seafarer’s Net, and the people of Gambier Islands who helped, supported, and cared about us while we were trying to save a life. Dave Brown, Crew, Longboat Moss.”

July 6

Sailing yacht Bob, from the Galapagos Islands, bound for Mangareva, Ile de Gambier, calls at Pitcairn Island with two crew members on board.  When the vessel departs Pitcairn on July 11, there are a total of five people on board.  The additional people are young Ryan Christian, his mother, Nadine, and Andrew Christian.  The voyage is an emergency evacuation of Ryan who has come down with an acute case of abdominal distress that could not adequately be cared for on Pitcairn.  Bob’s crew of Alex and Sarah volunteer to cut short their Pitcairn visit to get the youngster to medical care in Tahiti.  Even as Bob is leaving Pitcairn, an alerted supply ship bound for French Polynesia is diverting from their normal route, to rendezvous with Bob and collect Ryan and his mother.  Early the next morning after Bob’s departure from Pitcairn, the supply ship Taporo intercepts her and sends a tender to collect Ryan and Nadine to take them more speedily on to Mangareva, where they will then air-lifted to Tahiti.  After treatment in Tahiti, Ryan recovers, and ultimately returns to Pitcairn Island on the passenger-cargo ship Claymore II.

July 13

Sailing yacht Donazita, from Easter Island, bound for Ile de Gambier with two persons on board, calls at the Island.  The Donazeti, departs Pitcairn to the northwest on the same day as her arrival.

Augus 10

Sailing yacht Ohana, from the Gambier Islands, bound for Panama, calls at Pitcairn with three persons on board.  The yacht departs the Island on August 11.

August 18

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Gambier Islands, bound to Mangareva, calls with 14 passengers on board.  When she departs Pitcairn on August 21, there are five passengers on the ship.

August 22

Sailing yacht Escapade, from Mangareva, Gambier Islands, bound for Chile.  The yacht calls at Pitcairn Island on the 22nd and departs later during the same day.

August 25

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Ile de Gambier, calls at the Island with 13 passengers on board.  She departs on August 28, with eight passengers on board.

August 31

The sailing yacht Bob, whose call at the Island in July has been cut short when the yacht’s owners agree to make an emergency evacuation voyage to Mangareva with a seriously-ill Pitcairner, Ryan Christian, returns on this date to extend its interrupted visit.  Bob and her owners Alex and Sarah, continue their visit on Pitcairn until they sail for Ile de Gambier on September 7.

September 1

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Mangareva, bound for Ile de Gambier, calls at Pitcairn Island with seven passengers on board.  The ship departs the Island on September 4, with 13 passengers aboard.  

September 24

The Denmark-flagged, general cargo ship Anna K, 1,167 tons, whose home port is Svendborg, Denmark, from the West, bound to the East, does a scenic cruise by of Pitcairn Island.  “The ‘Anna K,’ with crew who had an interest in Pitcairn, came in close to give the crew a good look at the island on a Saturday afternoon,” reports the Pitcairn Miscellany newspaper.

October 12

Compagnie du Ponant’s 264-passenger cruise ship Le Soleal, 10,992 tons, from Tahiti, bound for Rapa Nui (Easter Island), calls at Pitcairn Island.  Passengers on the ship are not allowed to go ashore, a decision of the captain for passenger safety.  Melva Evans, the editor of the Island’s Pitcairn Miscellany newspaper, explains why cruise ship passengers are sometimes not allowed to go ashore, but Pitcairners will brave almost any poor or dangerous sea or weather condition to go out from the Island to the ship to visit and sell crafts and curios:

“The question is asked, ‘If we passengers can’t go ashore, why is it that you can come out to our ship?’  It’s a fair enough question, the answer to which is that we have been boarding ships practically all our lives.  We know when to ‘step up’ or ‘let go of the rope,’ and can read the idiosyncrasies of ocean swells that cause the longboats to rise or fall, separate from or crash into the ship.  The risks are the same, whether for visitor or local (we have had our share of incidents that caused injury); but, the risk is considerably lessoned for locals when experience is factored into the equation. 

“And so, depending on the weather or sea conditions, we often enjoy the experience of a ‘mini-holiday’ at sea, where we get to visit a different ‘town’ (albeit, a floating one), meeting lots of tourists, and buying chocolates from their shop.  We take our goods to market, setting up shop in their lounge or on their Lido Deck.  Then it becomes a frantic busy time for us as we hastily arrange carvings and weavings, soap, honey, jewelry, and other unique hand-made souvenirs from Pitcairn.  And, yes, we overhear comments that the carvings are all ‘made in China.’  Not so! 

”One of the activities that consumes a great deal of time on Pitcairn is the making of souvenirs for sale to tourists who visit on one of the several ships that call during the cruise ship season.  Our carvings are all diligently hand-made in a century-old tradition, handed down by a German visitor who taught Pitcairn men the art of wood-carving.  Styles may have changed, but the tradition is one that has never ceased since its inception, being handed down from one generation to the next.  Pitcairn carvings now grace the walls, mantelpieces and curio cabinets in homes all around the world.  T-shirts and printed material, though not made on Pitcairn, are, nonetheless, hugely popular items with tourists.”

November 2

Sailing yacht Mitsu, from Rapa Nui, bound for Ile de Gambier, with three person on board, calls at the Island.  The yacht departs Pitcairn for French Polynesia late in the same day of her arrival.

November 15

French naval coastal patrol vessel Arago (P675), 980 tons, from French Polynesia, bound for French Polynesia, makes a two-day call at Pitcain Island.  In addition to going ashore to shop for Pitcairn crafts and to visit, Arago’s crew, as has become a feature of most French navy ship visits to the Island, prepares a bar-b-q dinner for the Pitcairners in the Adamstown Square.

November 17

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from New Zealand via the Gambier Islands, bound for Mangareva, calls at Pitcairn Island with 11 passengers on board.  Claymore II departs the Island on November 20 with 11 passengers aboard.

November 24

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Mangareva, bound for Ile de Gambier, calls at the Island with nine passengers on board.  The ship departs Pitcairn on November 27, with 12 passengers on board.

December 1

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Ile de Gambier, bound for Mangareva, calls at Pitcairn Island with 14 passengers on board.  The ship departs the Island on December 4, with 13 Pitcairners and island visitors aboard.

December 5

Hapag-Lloyd’s 184-passenger cruise ship Hanseatic, (ex-Society Adventure), 8,373 tons, from Ile de Gambier, bound for Rapa Nui, calls at the Island.  In good weather, 132 of the ship’s passengers are ferried ashore on the ship’s Zodiac boats to enjoy the delight that is a visit to Pitcairn Island.  Of the visit, the Pitcairn Miscellany newspaper reports: “It was a long day for all in the (Pitcairn) community, but the fatigue vanished on receiving a message from the ship, after all guests were back on board and the vessel was underway to its next destination.  The message read, ‘. . . I have to say, after three years traveling with Hapag-Lloyd Cruises now, I very seldom see this kind of happy faces on our passengers as I did yesterday when bringing them back to the ship in the Zodiacs . . .’”

Year 2015

January 16

Wisby Tankers AB’s asphalt/bitumen ship Palanca Singapore, 10,830 tons, calls briefly at Pitcairn Island on this date. A welcomed vessel of the few commercial ships now calling at the Island.

January 20

Private yacht Novaria Austral makes a brief appearance off Bounty Bay, but does not land any of those aboard on Pitcairn Island.

January 23

Phoenix Reisen’s cruise ship MS Albatross, 28,518 tons, 674 feet in length, with a capacity of 812 passengers, arrives at Pitcairn Island on this date. Since January 23 is “Bounty Day,” the annual holiday on the Island that harks back January 23, 1790 – the day on which it is believed H.M.S. Bounty was burned just off Pitcairn to avoid detection by passing ships – the usual festivities of the day are postponed until January 25. With less than ideal sea conditions under rain-threatening clouds, the Pitcairners to out to the ship to sell their crafts and curios to passengers and crew. “Conditions alongside (the ship) were very rough, with some people having difficulties climbing the Jacob’s ladder to get on board,” writes an islander. “Assistance in ascending and descending is given by local men and once again proved invaluable. Manning the tiller (of the Pitcairn longboat) and working the engine to help steady the longboat were Jay Warren and Randall Christian. I would like to thank David Brown, Shawn Christian and Andrew Randall Christian for their assistance on the ropes, along with Jay and Randall, though I know they would shrug their shoulders and say, ‘we did nothing special.’ Those of us who got back ashore uninjured would say different, especially one woman who once again on firm footing on the (Pitcairn) jetty bend down and kissed the ground! Trading on the ship was swift, with many happy passengers visiting the markets spread over two of the ship’s lounges.”

February 8

Crystal Cruises’ cruise ship MV Crystal Serenity, 68,870 tons, 820 feet in length, 13 decks, calls at Pitcairn Island with long-time friends of the Island Ted Cookson and Barbara Stein on board among the nearly 1,000 passengers and 655 crew. “Trading (on the ship) was at a constant pace with many a local very pleased with the response of passengers to the opportunity to purchase locally crafted curios and printed items,” reports the Pitcairn Miscellany newspaper.

February 13

P & O Cruises’ 76,152-ton cruise ship MV Aurora circumnavigates Pitcairn Island on a cruise-by sightseeing journey on this date. Although the ship would not stop, Pitcairn Mayor Shawn Christian wishes those on board well on the rest of their voyage by VHF radio, and welcomes them to visit again in the future.

February 18

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, Pitcairn’s supply ship, is able to off-load most of its containers and freight for the Island on the days of her arrival, but worsening sea conditions were such it was felt in the best interest of safety to delay off-loading a number of the largest items the next morning. With dangerous seas continuing to lash Claymore II and the Island for the next two days, the ship had to depart Pitcairn on the afternoon of the third day with its cargo still not off-loaded, to meet commitments at Mangareva, in the Gambier Islands. Somehow, despite the terrible sea conditions, Meralda Warren and Heather Menzies had managed to board Claymore II before its departure so they could meet off-island commitments of their own.

February 21

Regent Seven Seas Cruises’ cruise ship MV Seven Seas Mariner, 48,075 tons, 709 feet in length, 700 passenger capacity, 445-member crew, was scheduled to stop at Pitcairn and allow trading on board, but sea conditions were so bad that this could not happen. Instead, the ship circumnavigated the Island before sailing eastward. Pitcairn Mayor Shawn Christian greeted and wished the ship well by VHF radio. “We look forward to seeing you again sometime in the future,” radioed Christian to the ship’s captain.

February 24

Costa Crociere’s cruise ship MS Costa Deliziosa, 92,700 tons, heaves to off Pitcairn Island for a 3½-hour visit. The Pitcairners come out to the ship from shore to sell Pitcairner-made crafts and curios to passengers and crew. “To say trading was fast and furious would be an overwhelming understatement,” writes one islander. “Indeed, at times you could easily lose sight of the person (Pitcairner) trading right next door to you under the deluge of eager shoppers. Climbing back down to the longboats was a chore in itself as many were still getting their heads around the frantic pace of trading we had encountered.” Upon heading toward shore after visiting MS Costa Deliziosa, two vessels were sighted stationed off Tedside at Pitcairn.

February 24

Redwise Company’s tub boats Angol and Dichato, 321 tons, bound to the East, each with five persons on board. The captains of both vessels come ashore for a tour of Pitcairn Island.

February 26

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Mangareva, Gambier Islands, brings eight passengers to the Island.

March 5

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Mangareva, calls at the Island with 13 passengers on board.

March 12

After having carried passengers from Pitcairn to Mangareva in the Gambier Islands, the passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, arrives at Pitcairn on this date with six passengers on board.

March 15

Amadea Shipping Company’s Bahamas-registered cruise ship MS Amadea, 28,856 tons, calls at Pitcairn Island on this date in clear and fine weather. The ideal weather conditions allow passengers to travel to shore via the Island’s longboats. “A most enjoyable day was had by all, with passengers coming back on board MS Amadea chattering excitedly about their time ashore, and the ride in out of Bounty Bay on the longboats, (The longboat crews must have had burning ears from all the compliments about their professionalism I heard from passengers.), writes a Pitcairner.

March 24

Sailing yacht Wigwam, with six persons on board, arrives at Pitcairn on this date.

March 24

With six people on board, the yacht Elcie calls at Pitcairn Island.

April 4

The large and luxurious yacht Triton, nine people on board, calls at the Island on this date.

April 4

Arriving at Pitcairn Island with one person on board on this date is the sailing yacht Nandi.

April 9

The yacht Amasia, with four person aboard, calls a Pitcairn on this date. “There have been a number of yachts calling at the island this month kicking off the ‘the yachtie season’ at Pitcairn,” writes an islander in the Pitcairn Miscellany newspaper.

April 12

Oceania Cruises’ Marshall Islands-registered cruise ship MV Marina, 66,000 tons, arrives at Pitcairn Island on this date. Pitcairners entertain passengers and sell their crafts and curios on the ship. “An enjoyable time was had by all with many crafts/curios bags a lot lighter on the journey home,” a Pitcairner writes.

May 7

With two persons on board, the sailing vessel Bounty, arrives at Pitcairn on this date.

May 14

The sailing vessel Mandolin, calls on this date with two persons on board.

May 21

The passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Taurange, New Zealand, arrives at the Island on this date, bringing Pitcairners Betty Christian and Clarice Oates for a visit to their home island after years abroad. The ship departs Pitcairn for Henderson Island of the Pitcairn Islands group with a team of five scientists and Pitcairn residents Sue O’Keefe and Pawl Warren. The group will conduct research on how to successfully eradicate the rats that seem to be over-running Henderson.

May 23

The sailing vessel Candine with three persons on board visits Pitcairn on this date.

May 28

Stoney Creek Shipping Company’s passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, having returned to Mangareva from Henderson Island, calls at Pitcairn on this date with 13 passengers on board. On May 27, the Pitcairners watch as two tugboats, in route to Chile from China pass close to the Island without stopping.

June 2

The private yacht Viveka, with a crew of two, calls at Pitcairn Island on this date.

June 4

The passanger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Mangareva, arrives on this date. Aboard the ship is Fredy and Chantal Taputu from Tahiti, he to serve as pastor of the Pitcairn Islands Seventh-day Adventist Church. “The Pitcairn Church community is enjoying having a minister again,” writes an islander in The Pitcairn Miscellany newspaper, “and the company of more islanders is strengthening the relationship between Pitcairn and our closest neighbor, French Polynesia.

July 12

The sailing yacht Istatsis with two persons on board, drops anchor off Bounty Bay on this date for a visit to the Island.

July 21

The private yacht Dual Dragons call as Pitcairn on this date with two persons on board.

August 5

Sailing vessel Voyager with a crew of two, arrives at Pitcairn on this date.

August 19

On this date, in rough but navigable seas, the Pitcairn islanders stand out from the south side of the island in their longboats to welcome Princess Cruises’ Bermuda-registered cruise ship Sea Princess, 77,499 tons, to the “Rock of the West,” as some of the islanders call Pitcairn Island. In the lee of the ship it was calm and sunny, and while she approached her anchor location whales jumped just off the ship’s bow, and waved flipper welcomes to on-looking passengers on deck and those of us in the longboats. How can you beat that for an arrival ceremony. . . . the Pitcairn community sang traditional songs up on deck before departing the ship in the afternoon.”

August 22

Sailing vessl 30 Beaufort with one person on board calls at Pitcairn on this date.

August 27

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Mangareva, arrives at Pitcairn Island with 22 passengers on board, five of whom will travel onward to Henderson Island as part of the rat eradication effort there.

September 3

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Mangareva, brings Pitcairner Carol Warren back home from New Zealand. Also on board were several tourists and two government auditors. The ship departs Pitcairn on September 6, taking tourists and scientists who had been conducting a fisheries management study and report in Pitcairn islands waters.

September 10

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II calls from Mangareva, Gambier Islands, bringing Pitcairner Steve Christian home from Tahiti. The ship departs Pitcairn the same day, taking Pitcairner Betty Christian to her home away from home in New Zealand.

October 28

Netherlands general cargo ship Happy Dragon, 14,784 tons, Captain Dinant Plasman, 26 persons on board, eight of whom are cadets since this is also a training ship. Captain Plasman splits shifts on the ship so all officers and crew can visit on Pitcairn Island.

October 31

French cruise ship company Compagnie du Ponant’s cruise ship L’Austral, 10,700 tons, on this date lands 160 of her passengers as visitors on Pitcairn Island for a fun holiday.

November 10

Zegrahm Expeditions cruise ship Caledonian Sky, 4,200 tons, from French Polynesia, bound for Easter Island. A familiar and welcomed caller at the Island, the ship brings Pitcairner Brenda Christian home after visiting family members abroad. Also on board is expedition leader Jack Grove, who reports to the Pitcairners on reconstruction of a deteriorating monument on Ducie Island, the easternmost island of the Pitcairn Islands Group that he directed. The monument heralds the wreck of the sailing ship Acadia. It reads, “The sailing ship Acadia ran aground at Ducie Island on June 5, 1881, with the loss of no lives. Discovered on November 13, 1989, by divers off the M.S. Society Explorer, the ship’s main anchor was later raised on March 17, 1990, and relocated to Pitcairn Island aboard M.S. World Discoverer. Seaward of this monument, in 10 meters of water, lies the ‘Acadia,’ which remains the property of the people of Pitcairn, and should not be disturbed. This monument was dedicated on March 17, 1990, in commemoration of the Bicentennial of Pitcairn Island, by Society Expeditions, Inc., Seattle, Washington, United States.”

November 19

The passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Mangareva, calls with three passengers, and later on the 19th, departs Pitcairn for Mangareva with 16 passengers.

November 19

Hapag-Lloyd Cruises’ cruise ship MS Bremen, 6,752 tons, arrives at Pitcairn on this date in stormy seas. “In our longboats, we took the curio market on board the ship while she was anchored off Tedside,” writes a correspondent. “She followed the longboat back to Bounty Bay to ensure that we landed safely. It was good to welcome her back to Pitcairn, and we hope for better weather for her next visit.”

November 22

Zegrahm Expeditions cruise ship Caledonian Sky, 4,200 tons, from Easter Island, bound for French Polynesia, returns to Pitcairn in ideal weather conditions that make it possible for 91 of her 92 passengers to go ashore for a visit to the Island.

November 23

National Geographic Bahamas-registered expedition ship Orion calls in fine weather that allows 62 passengers to be landed at Pitcairn’s Western Harbor for a visit to the Island.

November 26

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Mangareva brings a dozen people to the Island.

December 3

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Mangareva, Gambier Islands, brings six passengers to the Island on this date. Leaving Pitcairn soon after her arrival, Claymore II takes seven passengers to Mangareva.

December 10

Stoney Creek Shipping Company’s 38-meters long expedition ship Braveheart, from Mangareva, takes five passengers from Pitcairn Island.

December 24

Boomsa Shipping BV’s Netherlands-flagged heavy cargo lifter ship Frisian Spring, 4,087 tons, is a surprise called at Pitcairn Island on Christmas eve. The ship’s visit late in the evening hours nearly cancels the Island tradition of gathering Roseapple Christmas trees to be festooned with gifts in The Square on Christmas day. Frisian Spring is one of the ever-decreasing number of commercial ships calling at Pitcairn Island.

Year 2014

January 8

Oceania Cruises 60,084-ton cruise ship Marina calls at Pitcairn Island. With a length of 785 feet, the ship has a passenger capacity of 1,250 with a crew of 800. “Sales (on board the ship) were brisk, and many smiling faces headed ashore with pockets full and bags empty,” writes a Pitcairner. Through its numerous visits to Pitcairn Island, Marina has become a popular ship with the Pitcairn people.

January 16

Crystal Cruises’ 51,044-ton, 12-deck cruise ship MV Crystal Symphony calls at the Island. With a passenger capacity of 922, and a crew of 545, this ship brings Melva Warren Evans back to the island of her birth. “The fresh strawberries fed to us during our ship visit were divine and the waffles were mouth-watering,” writes a Pitcairner in Pitcairn Miscellany, the island’s newspaper.

January 24

Holland America’s 62,735-ton, 12-deck cruise ship MS Amsterdam, calls at Pitcairn Island. “This ship’s visit so soon after Marina’s and Crystal Symphony’s calls, leads us to remember what it must have been like when the passenger ships of yesteryear used to stop almost every week - to break up the long days at sea of Pacific voyaging, and the Pitcairners could visit aboard almost every calling. . . . The interaction with new faces and good business on board MS Amsterdam completely takes the feeling of isolation (of the Pitcairners) away.”

January 29

Three-masted sailing barque Picton Castle, a 179-foot-long training ship crewed by 12 professionals and 40 trainees, calls at Pitcairn Island. Aboard this frequent caller at Pitcairn is ship’s crew-member Pania Warren, the youngest daughter of Pawl Warren, Pitcairn’s-styled “pirate.” The ship’s several-days’ visit affords this young lady a welcomed reunion with her father.

February 8

Princess Cruise’s cruise ship Pacific Princess, calls at the Island from French Polynesia.

This 30,277-ton, 181-foot-in-length vessel, with an 826-passenger capacity, is always a welcomed ship at Pitcairn Island, especially when she stops for a visit, rather than simply circling the Island several times as she did on occasion in earlier voyages past the Island.

February 16

Cunard Line’s 16-deck, 40,049-ton cruise ship MS Queen Victoria, calls at Pitcairn on this date. The 964-foot-long Queen Victoria has a passenger capacity of 2,014, and a crew numbering 900 persons.

February 25

The Russian private yacht POBEDA, with three passengers, from Easter Island, bound for Mangareva, Gambier Islands, lands her passengers on Pitcairn for a visit before sailing to the northwest toward French Polynesia.

February 25

Kea, a private yacht, from Easter Island, bound for Mangareva, approaches but does not land its people at Pitcairn because of foul weather around the Island.

February 25

Arriving in stormy seas, Fred. Olsen Cruise Line’s 28,613-ton motor ship Black Watch cruises slowly around the Island before sailing eastward, leaving early to meet deadlines ahead.

February 27

Pitcairn’s supply ship, the passenger-cargo vessel Claymore II, from Mangareva, calls on this date with a group of 10 visitors from Norfolk Island, the isle to which all Pitcairners emigrated in 1856. Four of the visitors are direct descendants of the Bounty mutineers. One of the visitors, a mutineer descendant, says of the visit, “It was a spiritual journey to connect with our foremothers and fathers. Wi es the same kind of sullun.” Also arriving on Claymore II is Jim Park, a new teacher for the Pitcairn Island School.

March 5

The private yacht Miramis, with four passengers on board, calls at the Island.

March 6

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Mangareva, calls at Pitcairn Island with seven passengers.

March 8

The private yacht Funambule lands her four passengers at the Island for a visit.

March 8

With three passengers aboard, the private yacht, Grey Pearl, calls at Pitcairn Island.

March 8

Phoenix-Risen’s cruise ship MV Artania pays a visit to Pitcairn Island. The 44,448-ton vessel is 230 feet in length, and has a passenger capacity of 1,260, with a crew of 537.

March 13

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Mangareva, Gambier Islands, brings 13 passengers to the Island.

March 17

ResidenSea’s unusual, 43,524-ton, 644-foot-long residential ship The World, calls at Pitcairn Island amidst high winds and choppy seas. This unique, continuously cruising ship has residences on its 12 decks for between 150 and 200 people. Many from the ship enjoy a leisurely stay on the Island that includes visiting the museum, Adamstown’s Square, and the Bounty Anchor, the Bounty Bible on display in the Pitcairn Seventh-day Adventist Church. Also visited were the Echo Trail, John Adams’ Grave and the Pitcairn School.

March 18

From Easter Island, the private yacht Skoiern, with two passengers on board, calls at Pitcairn Island.

March 21

With two passengers on board, the private yacht Tidoudou visits at the Island.

April 2

The Danish private yacht Dan Kwi calls at Pitcairn with two passengers aboard, one born in New Zealand, but moved to Denmark at age seven – hence the name Dan Kiwi.

April 7

A.P. Moller Maersk’s container ship Maersk Brani, 35,835 tons, of Singapore registry, calls at Pitcairn for an emergency evacuation to take Vaine Warren-Peu to hospital care in New Zealand. A call is put out to shipping companies via Pitcairn’s Auckland office to see who has ships in the vicinity of Pitcairn that might consider stopping long enough to pick up a passenger. Maersk responds positively, and Maersk Brani heaves to off Bounty Bay on April 7 to take Vain aboard. As the Pitcairners bring Vaine out from the Island in one of Pitcairn’s longboats, they wave in greeting to the ship’s crew standing at the railing high above them, but receive only silence and stares of curiosity. Later, when they learn that the many packages and baskets of goodies being loaded onto the ship, in addition to the patient, Vaine, are presents for them, given for their answering the emergency call, arm waving and shouts of greeting quickly replace the former silence of the crew.

April 15

The private American yacht Andiamo, from Easter Island, calls at Pitcairn with two passengers on board.

April 18

The private French yacht Le Soly calls at the Island.

April 18

The Swedish yacht Anasthasia, with two people on board, calls at Pitcairn on this date.

April 21

A Finnish private yacht, the Marisol, with three passengers on board, calls at Pitcairn.

April 25

A French yacht, the Marick, brings two visitors to Pitcairn Island on this date.

April 25

The private yacht Traveller, voyaging from the United Kingdom and the United States, calls at the Island with two passengers aboard.

April 25

Equinoxe, a private French yacht with two passengers aboard, calls at the Island. The yacht arrives at the Island as the Pitcairners are celebrating ANZAC Day, an annual holiday on Pitcairn.

April 26

With three people on board, the private Polish yacht Lady Twin calls at Pitcairn.

April 27

Oceania Cruises’ cruise ship Marina with 1,214 passengers and a crew of 759, calls at Pitcairn, but does not land any of its passengers on the Island because of foul weather.

May 4

With six people on board, the private yacht, Crystal, calls at the Island.

May 14

The private yacht Necton, with four people on board, calls at Pitcairn Island on this date.

May 21

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Mangareva, Gambier Islands. This is Pitcairn’s supply ship, and in addition to bringing supplies, she brings five passengers to the Island.

May 26

With six people aboard, the private yacht Mosksh, calls at Pitcairn Island.

May 28

Nougue, a private yacht with two people aboard, calls at the Island.

May 29

Pitcairn’s supply ship, Clymore II, calls at Pitcairn Island with 12 passengers, some of whom are Pitcairners returning home from abroad, and others who will visit on the Island.

May 31

With two people on board, the private yacht Rijel, calls at the island.

June 4

Sailing vessel Dana Felicia, with three people on board calls at Pitcairn Island.

June 5

Sailing vessel Louise, with five people on board, drops anchor off Bounty Bay to pay a visit to the Island.

June 5

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Mangareva, Gambier Islands, calls at the Island with nine passengers on board.

June 12

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, having voyaged back to Mangareva with those leaving the Island, returns to Pitcairn on this date with six passengers and supplies. Among the supplies received is pizza stock for Pitcairner Andy Christian. The Island newspaper, The Pitcairn Miscellany, writes about Andy’s and other islanders’ culinary pursuits: “Andy Christian has received more pizza stock, so once again delicious takeaway pizzas are available on Pitcairn. Visiting USA guests couldn’t believe it when told that we were picking up pizza for lunch before their departure! It allowed more sightseeing time for their busy, four-day visit. With an island of so few people, visitors are often surprised at what is available here. We may be only 50 or so, but with varied tastes and multiple skills, we have at times, takeaway pizzas from Andy, takeaway burgers and Chinese meals from Delectable Bounty, and Fish and chips (or sausage and chips) from Dave Brown’s kitchen, and meals and/or coffees from Flatcher’s Café. A meal of tasty food with no preparation needed and minimal dishes to wash is always appreciated!”

July 16

The sailing vessel Selma, with five people on board, drops anchor off Bounty Bay at Pitcairn Island on this date. While this yacht is at Pitcairn, visitors and Pitcairners alike enjoy watching pods of the annually-returning humpback whales frolic just off the Island.

August 5

Large sailing vessel Infinity with 16 people aboard, calls at the Island.

August 13

Sailing vessel Whanake, with two people on board, drops anchor off Bounty Bay and begins a visit to Pitcairn Island.

August 15

Princess Cruises’ 77,441-ton cruise ship Dawn Princess, calls at Pitcairn on this date in calm, warm, sunny winter weather. Most of Pitcairn’s adult population boards one of the Island’s two longboats early in the morning to await the arrival of the ship with its 1,800 mostly Australian passengers and 900 crew members. “The (sea) conditions were calm and the Pitcairners boarded the ship via a pontoon. The helpful crew soon had the bags and boxes carrying carvings, t-shirts and general curios placed in the ship’s grand dining room for the islanders to set up their tables to trade . . . It was a very enjoyable day, and once ashore again a number of provisions ordered by the (Pitcairn) community were distributed. Everyone went home happy,” reports The Pitcairn Miscellany.

August 16

General cargo ship MV Norfolk Guardian, 1,598 tons, arrives at Pitcairn on this date carrying over 1,500 tons of heavy equipment which will be used to build a new harbor for the Island at Tedside. Because of foul weather, only five small loads of equipment could be ferried to The Landing in the first five days. While small loads were ferried ashore in Pitcairn’s own longboats, the heaviest pieces of equipment had to landed from a 30-ton barge. Each trip from ship to shore was a delicate operation, requiring carful maneuvering by the towing Pitcairn longboat, and shore crew using ropes to help gentle the barge into the prepared spot at The Landing to receive the cargo; far from an easy task given the rolling of the waves at The Landing.

August 28

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Mangareva, brings six passengers and supplies to Pitcairn Island.

September 3

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, returning to the Island from Mangareva, brings 12 passengers to Pitcairn.

September 11

With three passengers aboard, Pitcairn’s supply ship, Claymore II, from Mangareva, brings five passengers, including three returning-home Pitcairners, to the Island.

September 17

The sailing vessel, Jonathan, with three people on board, calls at Pitcairn Island.

October 9

Zegrahm Expeditions’ 4,200-ton cruise ship Caledonian Sky, calls at the Island, landing 82 of her passengers to visit various places of interest on Pitcairn Island.

October 11

Stoney Creek Shipping Company’s research ship Braveheart, from Mangareva, bound for Henderson Island, lands 11 passengers at Pitcairn Island on this date. The visitors are a bird watching group. After their Pitcairn visit, they will go to Henderson, and then to Oeno Island, both uninhabited, neighbor islands of the four-island Pitcairn Group. They’ll then return to Rikitea, Mangareva Island, in the Gambier Islands group where the closest air service to Pitcairn is located..

October 21

Cruise ship Caledonia Sky returns to Pitcairn, and on this date lands 104 of her passengers to visit on the Island.

November 7

Silverseas Cruises’ cruise ship MV Silver Explorer, 6,130 tons, from French Polynesia, calls at Pitcairn on this date in inclement weather and sea conditions that will not allow passengers to go ashore. Seldom daunted by bad weather, the Pitcairners brave winds and choppy seas to go out from the Island to the ship where they sell their crafts on board the vessel. The ship lays off Pitcairn through the night, hoping for better weather the next morning, but a thunderstorm and worsening conditions make visiting on the Island impossible.

November 9

Silversea Cruises’ 28,258-ton cruise ship Silver Shadow calls at Pitcairn Island in foul weather conditions such that will not allow passengers to visit on the Island. However, Pitcairners were able to go out to the ship and sell island crafts and curios on board.

November 21

This is Pitcairn’s supply day, and the Island’s supply ship Claymore II calls right on schedule with tons of supplies, which are quickly ferried from ship to shore by the Island’s skillful boat crews.

November 29

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Mangareva, Gambier Islands, calls at Pitcairn Island on this date with nine passenger-visitors.

November 29

Hapag-Lloyd Cruises’ 28,890-ton cruise ship MS Europa calls at Pitcairn Island on this date in fair weather conditions that allow passengers to be ferried from ship to shore. “Passengers took the opportunity to roam the roads and tracks, cameras at the ready,” reports the Pitcairn Miscellany newspaper. “Trading tables were scattered along the roadside and at The Landing, allowing passengers to pick up a memento of their visit to Pitcairn.”

December 5

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Mangareva, calls bringing five passengers to the Island.

December 9

The private yacht Drumbeat, drops anchor off Bounty Bay on this date, and lands the 10 people on board for a visit to Pitcairn Island.

December 13

Lindblad Expeditions exploration ship MV Orion, 3,984 tons, calls at Pitcairn Island late in the afternoon of the 13th with three Pitcairners returning from overseas assignments, and nearly 100 other passengers on board. The ship lays to off the Island overnight. Under clear skies and favorable sea conditions on the 14th, 94 passengers go ashore for an unforgettable visit to Pitcairn Island.

December 28

Oceania Cruises’ cruise ship MV Marina calls at the Island. “Despite favorable harbor conditions on the morning of the 28th, concerns that weather conditions could deteriorate over the course of the day meant that passengers were not able to land, dashing the hopes of all on board and islanders alike,” reports the Pitcairn Miscellany newspaper. “Instead, Pitcairners headed out to the ship for the day to spend time selling crafts and curios, and meeting new people.”

Year 2013

January 8

Ocean Cruises' cruise ship Marina, with a capicity of 1,250 passengers, from Easter Island, bound for Tahiti, Marquesas Islands.

January 15

Hapag-Lloyd's 28,890-ton cruise ship Europa, from Easter Island, bound for Tahiti, after what many on the ship called "a joyful visit" at Pitcairn Island.

January 22

Sailing ship Picton Castle, Captain Danny Moreland, bound to the west. This ship brings the ship's chief engineer, David 'DB' Brown, home to his family on Pitcairn. Picton Castle departs Pitcairn to the west on January 28.

January 24

Holland America Line's 62,735-ton cruise ship Amsterdam calls at the island to drop supplies only.

February 12

P&O's 86,799-ton cruise ship Arcadia from Easter Island, bound for Tahiti in the Marquesas Islands. This ship's crew of 976 serves a maximum of 2,388 passengers.

February 15

Princess Cruises' cruise ship Pacific Princess, from Easter Island, bound for Tahiti.

February 20

Stoney Creek Shipping's passenger-cargo vessel Claymore 2, from New Zealand, bound for Managreva in the Gambier Islands. The ship brings supplies to the island. When she departs she takes two Pitcairners.

February 25

An unnamed cargo ship, and an unnamed yacht call at Pitcairn Island on this date.

February 28

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore 2, from Mangareva, Gambier Islands, bound for Mangareva.

March 7

Passenger-cargo vessel Claymore 2, from Mangareva, bound for Mangareva, Gambier Islands.

March 16

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore 2, arrives from Mangareva in the Gambier Islands. When she departs Pitcairn Island on March 17, she is bound for Mangareva.

April 7

Sailing yacht Sauvage, from Easter Island, bound for Mangareva.

April 8

Catamaran Elsie with five passengers on board, from the East, bound for the Gambier Islands.

April 8

Sailing vessel Nana with a Swedish couple on board, from Columbia, South America, bound for Mangareva, Gambier Islands.

April 15

Catamaran My Muse with five persons on board, from the East, bound for Mangareva.

April 17

French-built sailing yacht Pacific Cool, Captain Jean Pierre, from the East, bound for the Gambier Islands.

April 17

Sailing vessel Hasta Luego, Captain Henry, from the Galapagos Islands, bound for Mangareva.

April 24

General cargo ship Dijksgracht, Douwe Hokwerda, Master, 17,381 tons, from Panama, bound for Auckland, New Zealand.

April 27

French naval frigate Prairail, 2,590 tons, from Easter Island, bound for Mururoa Atoll, French Polynesia.

May 16

American-owned sailing yacht Marie, from Auckland, New Zealand, bound for the Galapagos Islands.

May 23

Sailing yacht Sara Jane with three persons on board, from Easter Island, bound for Mangareva, Gambier Islands.

May 24

Swedish-registered sailing vessel Sea Venture with six persons on board, from the Galapagos Islands, bound for Mangareva, Gambier Islands.

June 6

Motor vessel Claymore II, from Mangareva, bound for Mangareva.

June 29

Forty-five-foot sailing vessel Coccinella, from the Galapagos Islands, bound for Mangareva, Gambier Islands.

June 29

Sailing yacht Chateau Beaumont, from Mangareva, bound for Henderson Island.

July 12

Yacht Wind Witch, from the Galapagos Islands, bound for Tahiti

July 19

Fifty-five-foot catamaran Saraba, from Mangareva, bound for Mangareva.

July 20

Yacht Australie, from the Galapagos Islands, bound for Mangareva, Gambier Islands.

August 5

Cargo ship Floretgratch, M. Stepanov, Master, from Geelong, Australia, bound for Ecuador, South America.

August 25

Cargo ship Marsgracht, 11,750 tons, Captain O. Nikitchenko, bound to the East.

August 30

Thirty-three-foot steel-hulled sailing yacht Polo Flat, from Mangareva, Gambier Islands, bound for Easter Island.

September 1

Motor vessel Braveheart, from Mangareva, bound to Mangareva.

September 5

Motor vessel Braveheart, from Mangareva.

September 5

Motor vessel Claymore II, from Mangareva, bound for Mangareva.

September 17

French yacht Da Boat, from Mangareva, Gambier Islands, bound for Easter Island.

September 17

Forty-five-foot sailing vessel Cocinella, from Mangareva, bound for Mangareva, on a charter. Carries three Pitcairners from the Island.

September 25

The 163-foot super yacht Ohana, from Tahiti, bound for Easter Island. The yacht brings three Pitcairners home from a Bounty Festival in Tahiti.

October 10

The yacht Tonga, with a crew of four, arrives at Pitcairn Island in high winds and dangerous seas. After a laborious day’s sail to approach the Island, the skipper decided not to anchor, and subsequently sailed on.

October 17

Costa Crociere’s 1,800-passenger, 650-crew cruise ship Costa neoRomantica, 54,000 tons, calls at Pitcairn Island for approximately one hour. A small team of Pitcairn officials is invited on board to exchange gifts and meet the ship’s captain. “Over champagne and hors d’oeuvres we were able to express the disappointment of Pitcairners that the first ship of the season – Costa neoRomantica – wasn’t able to be boarded by all and the regular market set up. The captain promised to report favorably back to the company on his brief visit, and hopefully next year’s ship will be able to stop for five to six hours, writes a Pitcairner.

November 22

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Mangareva, Gambier Islands, calls with two passengers aboard. Claymore II departs Pitcairn for Mangareva on November 25.

November 29

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Mangareva, arrives at Pitcairn with two passengers on board.

December 5

Hapag-Lloyd Cruises cruise ship MS Hanseatic, a vessel of 8,378 tons, 175 passengers, 125 crew, and 122-feet-in-length, arrives as the second ship in Pitcairn’s 2103-2014 cruise ship season.

December 5

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, calls at Pitcairn Island from Mangareva in the Gambier Islands.

December 16

The private yacht Attila, with two passengers on board, arrives at Pitcairn Island from Panama, bound for Tahiti in French Polynesia. Those on the Attila stay overnight before sailing to the northwest toward Tahiti.

December 25

Zegrahm Expeditions cruise ship Caledonian Sky, 4,200 tons, carrying 100 passengers and a crew of 70, arrives for a Christmas day visit to Pitcairn Island.

Year 2012

January 1

Yacht Odley, from USA, father and son crew.

January 19

Live fish transporting vessel Seify, from China, bound for Chile. The Seify is a live fish-transporting vessel.

January 21

Cruise ship Amadea, with 418 passengers and crew members. Many passengers from the ship come ashore to visit on Pitcairn Island.

January 25

Cruise ship Discovery, brings three tourists to the Island.

January 31

Sailing vessel Pitcairn, arriving on this vessel are five amateur radio operators.

February 2

Motor vessel Discovery, from Mangareva, arrives with four passengers, and departs the Island on February 5 with four passengers.

February 7

Motor vessel Saga Ruby, a cruise ship, arrives from Easter Island, bound for French Polynesia. Pitcairners visit on board and trade crafts, produce and curios. Three passengers come ashore to visit the Island, and nine passengers depart on her. The ship brings Pitcairn's new teachers, Paul and Ruth Shelling for a two-year teaching stay.

February 18

Motor vessel Discovery, from Mangareva, bound for Mangareva, calls with seven passengers. The vessel departs on February 20 with seven passengers on board.

February 21

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II from Mangareva, bound for Mangareva. She ship brings supplies and two passengers to the Island. She departs on February 22 with nine passengers on board.

February 22

Motor vessel Princess Danae, a cruise ship, from French Polynesia, bound for Easter Island. The ship departs Pitcairn on February 23, after islanders have come on board to trade crafts, produce and curios.

February 26

Motor vessel L'Austral, from Easter Island, bound for French Polynesia. The ship's tenders ferry 152 passengers shore for a visit on the Island.

March 1

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Mangareva, bound for Mangareva with five passengers on board. Takes nine passengers from the Island on departure on March 3.

March 3

Sailing yacht Bahari, from Easter Island, bound for Mangareva, with three persons on board. The yacht departs Pitcairn on March 4.

March 8

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Mangareva, with one passenger. Takes three passengers from the Island when departing on March 10.

March 15

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Mangareva with 13 passengers on board, 12 of them a National Geographic expedition team. Claymore II departs Pitcairn on March 19 for Ducie and Henderson islands with the expedition team aboard.

March 18

Motor vessel Hanseatic, a cruise ship, from French Polynesia. A total of 129 of the 153 passengers aboard the ship are ferried ashore for a visit on Pitcairn Island. The ship departs Pitcairn late in the afternoon.

March 23

Motor vessel Marsgracht, from New Zealand, bound for Panama. Pitcairners board the vessel to trade or sell Island crafts, produce and curios. Marsgracht departs Pitcairn in the afternoon.

March 26

Sailing yacht Explore, from New Zealand, bound for Mangareva. The yacht departs Pitcairn on March 28, with a crew of four and two passengers.

March 31

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Henderson Island with 12 passengers. The ship departs the same day with 10 passengers, bound for Oeno and Mangareva.

April 1

British sailing vessel Samba, from Easter Island, bound for Mangareva, with four persons on board sails the same day of arrival.

April 2

French sailing yacht Dalton, from Easter Island, bound for Mangareva, sails from Pitcairn in the same day as arrival with two persons on board.

April 9

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Mangareva, arrives with a team of National Geographic magazine personnel and three other passengers on board.

April 11

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, departs Pitcairn for Mangareva with the National Geographic magazine personnel on board, along with three other passengers.

April 12

Sailing yacht Xplore, arrives from Mangareva with seven passengers aboard. Aboard this vessel is classical organist Peter Letkemann, who in the Pitcairn Island Seventh-day Adventist Church on April 14 and 21, presents concerts of classical music.

April 14

Sailing yacht Xplore, departs Pitcairn for Mangareva with two passengers on board.

April 17

South African sailing vessel Spirit of Africa, arrives from Easter Island with two persons on board. The vessel departs Pitcairn after six days anchored offshore.

April 18

Northern Ireland sailing vessel Survetta, arrives from Easter Island with one person on board.

April 19

Sailing yacht Explore, arrives from Mangareva with four persons on board. She departs Pitcairn on April 21 with four persons on board.

April 22

German sailing vessel Resolute, from Easter Island, bound to the west with three persons on board. The yacht departs the same day as it arrives.

April 23

Australian sailing yacht Adventure Bound, arrives from the Galapagos Islands with two persons on board, spends two days at Pitcairn Island.

Sailing yacht Survetta, departs Pitcairn for Mangareva with one person on board.

April 24

Canadian sailing vessel Rough Bound, arrives from Easter Island, bound for Bora Bora with one person on board. She departs Pitcairn after seven days anchored offshore.

May 2

Sailing yacht Xplore, from Mangareva with one passenger, and later departs for Henderson Island with 5 passengers as part of the Henderson rat eradication program.

Sailing yacht Dalton, from Easter Island, departs same day for Mangareva with two passengers on board.

May 6

American sailing vessel Pelican, from Easter Island, departs later in the day for Mangareva with one person on board.

May 7

Sailing yacht Xplore, from Henderson Island with five passengers on board. The yacht departs for Mangareva on May 8 with one passenger on board.

May 8

German sailing vessel Wigwam, from Easter Island with two passengers on board. The yacht departs for Mangareva on May 10 with two passengers on board.

Dutch sailing vessel Viatrix, from Easter Island, with five passengers on board. The yacht departs for Mangareva after spending three days at the Island.

American sailing vessel Azimuth, from Easter Island with four passengers on board. The yacht departs for Mangareva on May 11 with four passengers on board

May 11

German sailing vessel Miepke II, from Easter Island with two passengers on board. The yacht departs Pitcairn later in the day.

May 16

Motor vessel Oberon, bound for Australia, stops and trades for three hours before departing Pitcairn.

May 19

Sailing vessel Wakame, from Easter Island with six passengers on board. The yacht departs Pitcairn for Mangareva on May 26 with six passengers on board.

May 23

Motor vessel Claymore II, from New Zealand, brings two passengers and stores to Pitcairn. Later in the day the ship departs for Mangareva with one passenger on board.

May 31

Motor vessel Claymore II, from Mangareva with 13 passengers on board. The ship departs Pitcairn for Mangareva on June 2.

June 7

Motor vessel Claymore II, from Mangareva with six passengers on board. The ship departs Pitcairn for Mangareva on June 9 with nine passengers on board.

June 20

Australian/French sailing vessel Passe-Partout, from Easter Island with two passengers on board. The yacht departs Pitcairn for Mangareva after seven days at Pitcairn.

June 22

Hungarian sailing vessel Unikum, from the Cocas Islands with two persons on board. The yacht departs Pitcairn after seven days for Mangareva.

June 23

British sailing vessel Tabbycat, from Easter Island with two persons on board. Tabbycat departs Pitcairn for Mangareva after five days at Pitcairn with two aboard.

June 29

British sailing vessel Murungaru, from Panama with four persons on board. She departs Pitcairn after five days anchored off the Island.

August 23

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from New Zealand, with stores for the island and four passengers, a Belgium film crew. The ship departs Pitcairn on August 24 for Mangareva.

August 30

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Mangareva with eight passengers including Pitcairn's Deputy Govenor Kevin Lynch, and the mayor of Mangareva, Monique Labbeyi and his interpreter. Also the new resident physician and Maria Amoamo, to replace the departing Dr. Kevin and Sharon Donovan. Also aboard is Pitcairner Kari Young and two Swiss tourists.

September 1

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II departs Pitcairn Island for Mangareva with eight passengers, including Pitcairn Deputy Governor Kevin Lynch, Monique Labbeyi, mayor of Mangareva; Dr. Kevin and Sharon Donovan; and Darlene, Caleb and Dylan.

September 6

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Mangareva, with six passengers, including Justice Sir Bruce Robertson, Jay and Carol Warren, two auditors and three tourists. The ship departs Pitcairn for Henderson with five passengers, two tourists and three off-islanders.

September 8

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Henderson Island with five passengers. The ship departs Pitcairn for Mangareva with eight passengers.

September 13

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, from Mangareva, with seven passengers. This is a special charter voyage for the National Geographic magazine and PEW Foundation. Also arriving on this ship is Melva Evans, a Pitcairner returning to her home island.

September 15

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, departs Pitcairn for Mangareva with seven passengers, including one Pitcairn islander going abroad for medical treatment. From Mangareva Claymore II, departs for its home port at Tauranga, New Zealand.

October 18

French naval vessel Arago (P675), Captain Arnaud Bolelli, from Tahiti, bound for Mangareva. While the ship is at Pitcairn the island's school children are invited aboard for a tour of the ship. In the evening of the 18th the Pitcairners and the ship's crew share a festive meal at The Landing. Arago sails for Mangareva at 2200 hours on October 19.

French naval vessel Arago (P675), calls from Mangareva at 0800 hours. The warship departs for Mururoa atoll at 2200 hours on October 19, after what the island newspaper describes as "a successful visit."

October 29

Yacht Dawnbreaker, from Easter Island, bound for Mangaeva with five persons on board. The vessel departs Pitcairn for Mangareva on October 31.

November 12

Two Wakatapu vessels, from Mangareva, bound for Rapanui (Easter Island) passed close to Pitcairn Island without stopping. School children were dismissed from classes and scaled Ship Landing Point so they could view the native craft as they passed. The waka vessels are following in the wake of their ancestors from Auckland, New Zealand, to Rapanui and return. The story of their voyage may be seen at www.wakatapu.com.

November 14

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II, arrives at 0800 hours with supplies from New Zealand. After discharge of her cargo, the ship departs for Mangareva, Gambier Islands with three passengers.

November 19

Sailing yacht Mala, from Easter Island, bound for French Polynesia, arrives at 1030 hours with two persons on board. The Mala sails at 0830 hours for Mangareva with two persons on board on November 21.

November 20

Sailing yacht Blue-shift, from Mangareva, bound to the east, calls at 1000 hours with five persons on board. Blue-shift sails for Easter Island at 1630 hours with five persons on board on November 21.

November 22

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II arrives at 0800 hours from Mangareva with 10 passengers on board. The ship departs for Henderson Island at 1800 hours on November 22 with six passengers on board.

November 24

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II arrives from Henderson Island at 0800 hours with two passengers on board. The ship departs for Mangareva at 1800 hours on November 25 with nine passengers on board.

November 29

Passenger-cargo ship Claymore II arrives from Mangareva at 0800 hours with 13 passengers on board. The ship departs at 1800 hours on November 29 for Henderson Island.

December 25

Noble Caledonia's cruise ship Caledonia Sky, Captain Newman, from Easter Island, bound for Mangareva, Gambier Islands. This ship accommodates 114 passengers and has a crew of 74.

For a listing of ships calling at Pitcairn Island – dating back to the landing of the Bounty mutineers, in 1790, – readers may purchase “Pitcairn – Port of Call,” 500 pages, from the Pitcairn Islands Study Center, 1 Angwin Ave., Angwin, CA 94508, $20.00 including postage in the U.S (call for overseas cost). The book lists all ship calls at Pitcairn from 1790 to 1990.) The book “Pitcairn Island as a Port of Call,” from Amazon.com, or McFarland & Co., Inc., Publishers, Jefferson, North Carolina, lists all ship calls at Pitcairn Island from 1790 to 2010.

Photo Log of Pitcairn Ship-Boat Callers

Thanks to the excellent photography of Pitcairner Brian Young (some of it obtained under extremely difficult weather and sea conditions), the Pitcairn Islands Study Center is able to present the following photographic log of ships that have called at the island in the recent past.

  • May 6, 2015 - Yacht Bounty
    The French yacht Bounty called at Bounty Bay just off Pitcairn Island on May 6, 2015, from Easter Island. Due to need of a safer anchorage, she was moved to the island's western harbor at Tedside for most of her 24-hour stay at Pitcairn. In the afternoon of May 8, Bounty's anchor was upped, and she made to the west-north-west for Mangareva in the Gambier Islands.
  • February 24, 2014 - Tugboats Agol and Dichato
    Just as the cruise ship Costa Deliziosa (in red) was departing from Pitcairn Island for Easter Island on February 24, 2015, two tugboats, the Agol and the Dichato, each with a crew of five, came into sight in Pitcairn waters near the Island. Sailing from Hong Kong to Chile, the two small but powerful boats were on their way to begin service in the harbors of Chile. These two China-built tugs are the second and third such vessels to visit Pitcairn waters. On December 28, 2013, the China-built tugboat Lebu, also bound for service in Chilean harbors, visited in Pitcairn Island waters.
  • February 24, 2015 - Cruise ship Costa Deliziosa
    Calling at Pitcairn Island on February 24, 2015, from Tahiti was the Costa Cruise Line's 92,700 gross tonnage cruise ship Costa Deliziosa. The 964-foot-long vessel has a Genoa, Italy, registry. She is authorized to carry 2,828 passengers and a crew of 1,100. After a pleasant visit at Pitcairn, Costa Deliziosa set sail eastward for Easter Island.
  • February 8, 2015 - Cruise ship Crystal Serenity
    Crystal Cruises' 68,870-ton cruise ship Crystal Serenity, voyaging from Easter Island to Tahiti, called at Pitcairn Island on February 8, 2015. "Everybody on Pitcairn Island was happy about this fine cruise ship's visit," said a Pitcairner. "The trading was very good onboard, and we all sold out of island-crafts and other items; one lady literally bought the shirt off my back, as she insisted on buying the purple Pitcairn shirt I was wearing, and she provided one of her blouses for me to keep. The passengers were excited and impressed when we gathered in the large foyer to sing three of our Pitcairn songs - it sounded magnificent." Crystal Serenity, on a more than 100-day, around-the-world cruise, measures 820 feet in length, is 106 feet wide, has 13 decks, and ploughs the ocean at 21 knots. Her maximum capacity is 1,070 passengers and a crew of 655.
  • January 23, 2015 - Cruise ship Albatros
    The motor ship Albatros, operated by the Germany-based travel agency Phoenix Reisen, called at Pitcairn Island on January 23, 2015. Passengers and crew aboard the ship spent an enjoyable time with the Pitcairn Islanders who came aboard the vessel to trade or sell crafts, curios and other items offered by the Pitcairners. The 583-foot long Albatros has a 28,518 gross register tonnage, with a width of 83 feet, and Nassau, Bahamas, as her Port of Registry.
  • January 19, 2014, Tanker Palanca Singapore
    The 10,830-ton tanker ship Palance Singapore, sailing from the east coast of the United States via the Panama Canal to Australia, called at Pitcairn Island for a brief visit on January 19, 2014. Though registered in the Marshall Islands, the captain and crew of Palance Singapore are Swedish. The captain's father had been the captain of one of the several Stolt line ships that were regular Pitcairn visitors in the past 30 years. "Palance Singapore is the first 'ordinary' (commercial) ship we have had call here for a long, long time," said a Pitcairner.
  • December 28, 2014, Cruise ship Marina
    The 15-deck, 66,084-ton Oceania Cruises ship Marina called at Pitcairn Island on December 28, 2014, with hundreds of passengers and a crew of 800 on board. Rough seas in Pitcairn's Bounty Bay area caused the ship to have to come to anchor in the lee or eastern side of the island. "Gladys Lintz, the granddaughter of Pitcairner Ida Young and three other members of that family were aboard Marina, so there was quite a reunion on board," reported one islander. "The trading of Pitcairn crafts and curios on board the ship between the Pitcairners and passengers and crew was extremely good. That left our bags and boxes, which had held these for-sale items, nearly empty and our pocketbooks full of dollars!" Of Marshall Islands registry, Marina is 785 feet in length, with a beam of 106 feet, and a cruising speed of 20 knots.
  • December 8, 2014, Sailing Yacht Drumbeat
    Photo courtesy of Pitcairner Kerry Young
    The large sailing yacht Drumbeat called at Pitcairn Island on December 8, 2014, and anchored at Tedside in the lee of the island. Arriving from Mangareva, Drumbeat set sail for Easter Island and then for Antarctica the day after her arrival. Drumbeat has a international crew of 10 members and is of Cayman Islands registry.
  • November 29, 2014, Cruise Tanker ship Europa
    Hapag-Lloyd's 652-foot cruise ship Europa, which is billed by the company as "The most beautiful yacht in the world," called at Pitcairn Island on November 29, 2014. Calling from Easter Island, and bound for French Polynesia to the northwest, Europa's hundreds of passengers enjoyed their brief visit at Pitcairn. As the ship departed later in the same day of her arrival, she carried with her Pitcairner Brian Young who was being evacuated to a hospital at Tahiti for emergency medical care. Built in a Finnish shipyard in 1999, Europa carries a crew of 285 to serve her 400 passengers, and she ploughs the ocean waters at 21 knots cruising speed.
  • November 9, 2014, Cruise ship Silver Shadow
    With 289 passengers and more than 200 crew members on board, the cruise ship Silver Shadow called at Pitcairn Island on November 9, 2014. Arriving in rough weather from French Polynesia and bound for Easter Island, the ship hove to off Bounty Bay while Pitcairn Islanders came aboard to barter and sell their crafts and curios. "The people on board were very friendly, and trading was good," said a Pitcairner. From stores on the ship, soft drinks, frozen chickens and numerous other food items were sold to the Pitcairners. After a four-hour stay at Pitcairn, Silver Shadow pointed her bow eastward and made for distant Easter Island.
  • November 7, 2014, Cruise Ship Silver Explorer
    Silversea's 6,072-ton, luxury cruise ship Silver Explorer called at Pitcairn Island on November 7, 2014, with 110 guests and a crew of 100 aboard. Calling from Mangareva in the Gambier Islands, Silver Explorer arrived at Pitcairn in weather that was quite rough, with swells coming into Bounty Bay so heavily that it was not possible for passengers to land. Though the ship was scheduled to depart for Henderson Island on the evening of her arrival at Pitcairn, the passengers wanted so much to land on Pitcairn that the ship sayed overnight to see if landing was possible the next day. Sad to say, the weather was still too rough, making it not possible to land anyone. The 354-foot long Silver Explorer left at about mid-day for Easter Island.
  • November 6, 2014, Ship Braveheart
    Soney Creek Shipping Company's ship Braveheart called at Pitcairn Island on November 6, 2014, from Mangareva in the Gambier Islands. Aboard the ship were 13 passengers who visited on Pitcairn for a day before departing in the evening for Henderson, another of the Pitcairn islands group. During her visit to Pitcairn in October, Braveheart's anchor was lost, so during this visit Captain Matt Jolly set the ship on a drifting course around the island as his passengers visited ashore during the day.
  • October 21, 2014, Cruise ship Caledonian Sky
    In the morning of October 21, 2014, the cruise ship Calendonia Sky called at Pitcairn from Henderson Island, another of the Pitcairn group of four islands. Because of rough weather, the ship anchored off Tedside in Pitcairn's lee (or less windy side), and most of the passengers were able to come ashore for a pleasant visit. At 6 p.m., on the 21st, Caledonia Sky hauled her hook (anchor) aboard, and headed for Oeno Island, another of the Pitcairn group, which lies 76 miles north-north-west of Pitcairn. Following her call at Oeno, Caledonia Sky was scheduled to make for Mangareva in the Gambier Islands.
  • October 16, 2014, Ship Braveheart
    Stoney Creek Shipping Company's ship Braveheart, Captain Matt Jolly, called at Pitcairn Island from Mangareva in the Gambier Islands on October 16, 2014, with 11 passengers on board, practically all of them avid "birders." The passengers enjoyed most of the day ashore on the Island, but Braveheart had to run about the Island, unable to anchor because of a broken windless. Late in the afternoon of the 16th, with all aboard again, Braveheart pointed her bow to the east-north-east heading for Henderson Island, some 107 miles from Pitcairn.
  • October 9, 2014, Cruise Ship Caledonia Sky
    At 7:30 in the morning of October 9, 2014, the Caledonia Sky Sea Cruises' ship Caledonia Sky, from Mangareva in the Gambier Islands and bound for Easter Island, called at Pitcairn Island with 89 passengers on board. Since the wind was blowing from the northeast, the ship anchored off Ginger Valley at the Island. All but three of the passengers came ashore on Pitcairn for an enjoyable visit. Upon departing Pitcairn, Caledonia Sky made for nearby Henderson Island, and then eastward to Ducie Island before voyaging on to Easter Island. Built in 1991, Caledonia Sky is a ship of 4,200 tons, with a crew of 74 and a minimum/maximum capacity of 114 passengers.
  • September 16, 2014, Sailing Yacht Jonathan
    In a rainy weather morning, the sailing yacht Jonathan called at Pitcairn Island from Mangareva in the Gambier Islands. The prevailing winds being from the south, the vessel was anchored off Bounty Bay for a one day visit at Pitcairn. After an enjoyable time ashore, the two-member crew of Jonathan departed in their sailing vessel for Easter Island some 1,300 miles to the east.
  • August 16, 2014, Cruise ship Norfolk Guardian
    The 1,598-ton cargo ship Norfolk Guardian, sailing under the flag of Tonga, arrived at Pitcairn Island on August 16, 2014, carrying tons of supplies and equipment for the construction of a harbor at the Tedside area of Pitcairn. Completion of this harbor, a first for Pitcairn, will allow for the safe landing of visitors to the island. Because of high winds and rough seas, off-loading of the Norfolk Guardian's cargo was delayed for several days; she departed Pitcairn on August 27, 2014.
  • August 15, 2014, Cruise ship Dawn Princess
    The 77,499-gross ton, Sun-class cruise ship Dawn Princess of the Princess Cruises line called at Pitcairn on Friday, August 15, 2014. Brisk trading of Pitcairn's many curios, crafts and other items was done by the Pitcairners aboard the ship until her departure later in the day for her next port of call. Dawn Princess was built in 1997 in Italy. The ship is 873 feet in length and has a beam of 105 feet. With a crew of 900, Dawn Princess accommodates 1,900 passengers.
  • August 15, 2014, Sailing Yacht Wanaka
    The New Zealand sailing yacht Wanaka, from Easter Island and bound for Mangareva in the Gambier Islands, called at Pitcairn Island on August 15, 2014. After visiting on the island, the vessel's two-member crew departed on August 16 for Mangareva. They took with them on Wanaka Pitcairn Postmaster Dennis Christian who needed transportation to the closest airstrip to Pitcairn which is at Rikitea on Mangareva. There he was able to board an airplane for medical treatment at Pitcairn's closest hospital, which is at Papeete, Tahiti, some 1,200 miles from Pitcairn.
  • August 5, 2014, Yacht Infinity
    Photo courtesy of Dennis Christian.
    The large German yacht Infinity called at Pitcairn Island on August 5, 2014, from its previous port of call, Easter Island. With 16 person on board, the yacht was first anchored at Rope, and then on the second and third days of her visit, she was anchored at Bounty Bay. Half of those on board Infinity came ashore on the first day of her call, with the remainder visiting on the island on the second day. At just after lunch on the third day, Infinity upped anchor and pointed her nose northwestward for the island of Mangareva.
  • July 16, 2014, Yacht Selma
    Photo courtesy of Pitcairner Melva Evans
    The two-masted yacht Selma of Selma Expeditions called at Pitcairn Island from Easter Island with a crew of five, the captain and his partner being Polish, while the others are from three other countries. After being anchored at Bounty Bay, those from the vessel had an enjoyable time visiting on Pitcairn. The Selma departed Pitcairn for Mangareva and Tahiti on Thursday, July 17, 2014.
  • May 31, 2014, yacht Rigel   -   June 4, 2014, yacht Dana Felicia.
    With two persons on board, the Canadian yacht Rigel arrived off Bounty Bay, Pitcairn Island, from Easter Island on May 31, 2014. The yacht was moved to Tedside where she was anchored while the two persons on board came ashore to enjoy visiting and sight-seeing on the Island. After a two-day stay, the Rigel set sail for Mangareva in the Gambier Islands.

    In the teeth of east winds gusting up to 30 knots at times, the Danish yacht Dana Felicia arrived off Bounty Bay at Pitcairn Island on June 4, 2014. The high winds made anchoring at Bounty Bay impossible, so the Dana Felicia was anchored at Tedside in Pitcairn's lee, where those on board the vessel had to wait almost days before they could land on the Island. After an all too short visit ashore by the crew, Dana Felicia sailed for Mangareva in the Gambier Island group on June 8.
  • May 26, 2014, yacht Moksha   -   May 27, 2014, yacht Noroue.
    Calling in from Easter Island on May 26, 2014, the yacht Moksha anchored of Bounty Bay for the day, and all on board came ashore to visit and enjoy touring Pitcairn Island. Late in the evening of her arrival day the Moksha sailed for Mangareva in the Gambier Islands.

    Arriving in the early morning of May 27, 2014, from Easter Island, the Canadian yacht Noroue anchored off Bounty Bay at Pitcairn Island. The two persons on board came ashore to enjoy meeting the Pitcairn people and viewing the beauties of the Island. On May 28, the Noroue set sail to the northwest for Mangareva in the Gambier Islands group.
  • May 1, 2014, yacht Crystal   -   May 14, 2014, yacht Necton.
    The British yacht Crystal arrived at Pitcairn Island on May 1, 2014, from Easter Island. On board the vessel was a crew of six Polish men. Although the weather was bad, the yacht was anchored in the lee of the island for four days while crew members enjoyed sightseeing and visiting the Pitcairn community. On May 4, Crystal made sail to the northwest for the Marquesas.

    With four people on board, the Dutch yacht Necton called at Pitcairn Island on May 14, 2014. Two of those arriving on the yacht were Russians, while the captain was Dutch and a fourth crew member was Danish. After arriving from Easter Island, the yacht was anchored in Bounty Bay while the four crew members came ashore to visit. Necton departed Pitcairn in the evening of the 14th, bound for Mangareva in the Gambier Islands.
  • April 27, 2014, cruise ship Marina
    In the morning of April 27, 2014, Oceania Cruises' big 66,084-ton cruise ship Marina with 1,274 passengers aboard, called at Pitcairn Island from Tahiti. The weather was too rough for the ship to anchor off Bounty Bay, so she was moved to an area off Ginger Valley, and there the Pitcairners came aboard to do a brisk business of selling and trading until 2 o'clock in the afternoon. "Trading was very good," said a Pitcairner who went aboard the ship. "Stores from the ship were swapped for Pitcairn bananas and paw paws. A good (selling) day was had by most of the islanders who went on board." The ship sailed from Pitcairn for Easter Island in mid-afternoon of the 27th. Built in 2011, Marina is 785 feet in length and has a beam of 106 feet. There are 15 decks on the ship which travels at 20 knots, and is registered in the Marshall Islands.
  • April 26, 2014, yacht Anastasia
    The Swedish yacht Anastasia, having sailed from Easter Island, called at Pitcairn on April 26, 2014. With two persons on board, the yacht was first anchored off Tedside in Pitcairn's lee, and later it was moved around to the Ginger Valley area. After a two-day visit at Pitcairn, Anastasia sailed to the northwest, bound for Mangareva in the Gambier Islands.
  • April 25, 2014, yacht Traveller   -   April 25, 2014, yacht Lady Twin.
    With two persons on board, the American yacht Traveller called at Pitcairn Island on April 25, 2014. During her two-day stay at Pitcairn the yacht was anchored at Tedside . On April 27, Traveller's crew hauled up the vessel's anchor and sailed to the northwest for Mangareva in the Gambier Islands.

    The Belgium yacht Lady Twin with three Polish men aboard, was a Pitcairn called late in the evening of April 25, 2014. Lady Twin's port of call previous to Pitcairn had been Easter Island. After a two-day anchorage at Tedside on Pitcairn's lee, Lady Twin sailed from Pitcairn for Mangareva Island in the Gambier Group of islands.
  • April 25, 2014, yacht Equinox   -   April 25, 2014, yacht Meric.
    Equinox called at Pitcairn Island on April 25, 2014. Equinox's previous port of call before reaching Pitcairn had been Easter Island. After being anchored off Tedside in Pitcairn's lee for about 24 hours, Equinox made sail for Mangareva Island in the Gambier Group of islands.

    Arriving at Pitcairn at the same time as the yacht Equonix was the French yacht Meric with two persons on board. Spending one day off Pitcairn, the Meric set sail to the northwest in the evening of April 26, with Mangareva in the Gambier Islands being her destination.
  • April 7, 2014, container ship Maersk Brunei
    On Monday, April 7, 2014, answering to an emergency call from Pitcairn, the big Maersk Line container ship Maersk Brunei which had diverted from its normal shipping lane arrived off Bounty Bay. Pitcairn Mayor Shawn Christian and Vaine Peu went aboard the vessel in preparation for Vaine being transported to a hospital in New Zealand, where he will be treated for an undisclosed heart problem. The ship lay off Pitcairn for only a half hour before continuing onward to New Zealand. A large gift of fruits and fish was given to the ship by the Pitcairners as a "thank you" for answering to their call for help.
  • April 17, 2014, yacht Soley
    With one person aboard, the 38-foot French yacht Soley called at Pitcairn on April 17, 2014, from Easter Island. Strong east-south-east winds made the sea too rough to anchor the vessel off Bounty Bay, so it was moved to Tedside in the island's lee. Being of a frugal nature, or perhaps simply because he wanted all to know his athleticism, the Soley's skipper chose to swim ashore rather than pay the 60-dollar ferry fee from the yacht to shore. On April 19, Soley upped anchor and made to the northwest, bound for Mangareva in the Gambier Islands.
  • April 1, 2014, catamaran Dan Kiwi
    The Danish catamaran Dan Kiwi arrived off Bounty Bay on April 1, from Easter Island. Aboard Dan Kiwi were Captain-owner Ingolf Nielsen and one crew member. Four days before arriving at Pitcairn they encountered a Pacific storm which did some minor damage to the vessel. According to Pitcairner Brian Young, during Dan Kiwi's visit at the island "the weather was at its best, with a flat calm to the sea outside Bounty Bay making for a good anchoring." On April 4, Dan Kiwi upped anchor and sailed off toward Mangareva in the Gambier Islands to the west-northwest of Pitcairn.
  • March 20, 2014, the yacht Tidoudou
    The 35-foot French yacht Tidoudou called at Pitcairn Island, the vessel's previous port of call being Easter Island. Upon her arrival Tidoudou was anchored off Bounty Bay, and the French couple on board were able to visit the island until March 21, when she departed for Mangareva in the Gambier Islands.
  • March 17, 2014, the yacht Skoiern
    On March 17, 2014, the yacht Skoiern called at Pitcairn Island, her previous port of call having been at Easter Island. Because of rough seas at Bounty Bay, the vessel was anchored at Tedside, and the French couple on board were able to come ashore for a pleasant visit on the island. On March 18, Skoiern upped-anchor and sailed northwestward for Mangareva in the Gambier Islands.
  • March 17, 2014, residence cruise ship The World
    The giant, continuously cruising residence ship The World, 43,524 gross tons, called at Pitcairn Island on March 17, 2014, with 130 plus resident families and a crew of 250 aboard. Sea conditions alongside the ship were quite rough so not all those on board were able to come ashore and enjoy Pitcairn's world-famous hospitality. The ship made use of its own Zodiac boats to land those who were adventurous enough to go ashore, reported Pitcairner Brian Young. The World calls itself "the largest privately owned yacht on the planet." Its residents, from about 19 countries, travel the world continuously, usually staying at ports of call for three days. All residents have a say in the ever-changing itinerary of the ship, expedition options and onboard activities and issues. Residents have the ability to travel the globe without leaving the comforts of home. The World was launched in March 2002. Her length is 644 feet, with a beam of almost 98 feet and a speed of 18.5 knots (just over 21 miles per hour. MS The World is operated by residenSea out of Miramar, Florida.
  • March 8, 2014, German cruise ship Artania
    The German cruise ship Artania of the Phoenix Reisen fleet arrived at Pitcairn Island from the west with 960 passengers and a crew of about 500 on board on March 8, 2014. After the Pitcairn islanders came aboard the ship loaded down with their sale items, the ship's captain very generously did two huge slow-speed circles around Pitcairn that allowed some six hours for selling and trading, which, according to one Pitcairner, "was good." The ship's store was also kindly opened to the islanders for the purchase of needed items. Once the Pitcairners had debarked from Artania, the ship started ploughing the seas eastward, bound for Easter Island. Artania was built in 1984 at the Helsinki Shipyard in Helsinki, Finland. She is 756.59 feet in length, with a beam of 105.64 feet. There are eight passenger decks on the vessel, and she sails the ocean at 22 knots.
  • March 8, 2014, French yacht Funambvle   -   French yacht Grey Pearl.
    With a family of four aboard, the French yacht Funambvle called at Pitcairn Island from Easter Island on March 8, 2014. The family visited on Pitcairn until March 10, and departed for Mangareva in the Gambier Islands, but with a stop at Pitcairn's sister island of Oeno before proceeding to Mangareva.

    The 16-meter French yacht Grey Pearl showed its sail off Bounty Bay, Pitcairn Island, on March 8, 2014, with a family of three on board. Along with the yacht Funambvle, Grey Pearl was anchored off Bounty Bay for a two-day visit on the Island. On the 10th, along with Funambvle, Grey Pearl upped anchor and headed for Oeno Island before sailing onward to Mangareva in the Gambier Islands.
  • March 5, 2014, Swedish sailing yacht Miramis
    Arriving at Pitcairn from the Galapagos Islands on March 5, 2014, was the Swedish sailing yacht Miramis with two Swedish men and two Asian women aboard. The 41-foot, glass-hull vessel was anchored off Ginger Valley until she sailed for Mangareva in the Gambier Islands on March 8, 2014. All four of those on Miramis were able to spend happy and quality time on the Island before they sailed northwestward.
  • February 25, 2014, Fred Olsen line cruise ship Black Watch
    It was a "black day" for Pitcairn islanders when the cruise ship Black Watch passed close by the island. The reason for the blackness of the day was that Black Watch's captain decided not to stop and let the Pitcairners come aboard to trade their interesting crafts and other items with passengers. Despite radio entreaties to him to stop even for a short time so the islanders could come aboard and offer the many items they had prepared, it was of no interest to this captain. With over 600 passengers on board the ship plus at least half as many crew members, the captain's decision was a great loss to the Pitcairners. The ship arrived at about 9 a.m., from Easter Island, cruised at slow speed once around the island, and then headed northwestward for Tahiti.
  • February 25, 2014, Russian yacht Noseaa
    The Russian yacht Noseaa, from Easter Island and bound for Mangareva in the Gambier Islands, called at Pitcairn on February 25, her crew of three, one Russian and two Chileans, spending a pleasant day ashore. In the late afternoon of Noseaa's call, the wind started to increase and the yacht started to drag her anchor, always a potentially dangerous matter in the waters around Pitcairn. Fortunately one of the crew was aboard the yacht at the time and he was able to remedy the problem. Late in the evening the Noseaa upped anchor and got under way for Mangareva to the northwest from Pitcairn.
  • February 24, 2014, Chilean fishing boat Vali
    Late in the evening of February 24, the Chilean fishing boat Vali, Captain Carlos, on her maiden voyage from China to Punta Arenas, Chile, sailed very close by Pitcairn's Bounty Bay. Night-time conditions prevented the ship from stopping as she passed very close to Pitcairn. Vali has a crew of six.
  • February 16, 2014, Cruise ship Queen Victoria
    In good weather on February 16, the 90,000-ton cruise ship Queen Victoria called at Pitcairn at 8 a.m., from Easter Island with 1,690 passengers and a crew of 1,000 on board. The ship was at Pitcairn for four hours during which time trading by the Pitcairners with passengers and crew was brisk, and profitable. During the trading period, the ship cruised slowly around the island twice. "This was a very friendly ship," said an islander, "with the crew being helpful to the Pitcairners in carrying boxes and baskets of trade goods up from the Pitcairn longboats to where trading was permitted on the ship." When the Pitcairners left the ship at around midday, she moved away to the northwest setting her course for Tahiti."
  • February 8, 2014, Cruise ship Pacific Princess
    Under weather that was rain showers and thunder-filled, but with light to moderate sea conditions, the 30,277-ton cruise ship Pacific Princess arrived at 9:30 a.m., off Pitcairn Island from Easter Island on February 8 with 629 passengers on board. The ship did not anchor but made a full, extended turn around the island which allowed the Pitcairners to come aboard for some three hours of trading and selling of island crafts and curios. Pitcairn's longboat Tub had engine trouble in attempting to reach the ship, so the second boat, Tin, after putting its passengers aboard Pacific Princess, came to the rescue. Tin returned to where Tub was dead in the water a mile off the north side of Pitcairn, took her in tow and saw to her being safely anchored just off the Pitcairn harbor. Tin then returned to Pacific Princess and retrieved the Pitcairners who had been on board the cruise ship selling island items. Shortly after Tin left the side of the ship, Pacific Princess left the Pitcairn area, her bow pointed northwesterly for Tahiti. The seven-deck Pacific Princess, owned by Princess Cruises, was launched in 1999 at St. Nazaire, France. She is registered in Great Britain.
  • January 29, 2014, three-masted sailing bark Picton Castle
    In fair weather on January 29, 2014, the three-masted sailing barque Picton Castle, a veteran Pitcairn Island caller, arrived at the Island from Bay of Islands, New Zealand. Aboard this one of the last vestiges of the era of sailing ships was Captain Danny Moreland and a crew of 23. The ship brought lumber and boxes for both the Island government and for individuals living on Pitcairn. After anchoring off Bounty Bay, the ship's crew came ashore in rotation for a couple of nights ashore. Though Captain Moreland planned for a stay of only four days at Pitcairn, the length of earlier visits of the ship have often exceeded the captain's expectations. Picton Castle is registered in the Cook Islands, in the South Pacific Ocean, and is owned and operated by the Windward Isles Sailing Ship Company, Ltd. The ship's mission is deep-ocean sail training and long-distance education. Also, she carries supplies and educational materials to far-flung islands in the South Pacific. Her North American homeport is Lumenburg, Nova Scotia.
  • January 24, 2014, Cruise ship MS Amsterdam
    In good weather on the morning of January 24, the MS Amsterdam arrived at Pitcairn Island from Easter Island, her previous port of call. Some 990 passengers and a crew of 670 were on the ship as she cruised around the island for three hours while the Pitcairn islanders, who had come on board, were able to conduct a brisk time of selling and trading with the passengers on the ship's Lido deck. When the Pitcairners had disembarked to return to their island homes, Amsterdam pointed her bow northwestward and got under way for the island of Tahiti. Amsterdam made her maiden voyage in October of 2000; her length is 777.6 feet, and she has a beam of 105.8 feet. She ship is comprised of 12 decks, and travels the ocean at 25 knots, or about 29 miles per hour.
  • January 16, 2014, Cruise ship Crystal Symphony
    In good weather shortly before 8 a.m., on Thursday, January 16, the 50,000-ton cruise ship Crystal Symphony having sailed from Easter Island, came to anchor just off Pitcairn Island for a day of trading and visiting with the Pitcairn people. Aboard the Crystal Cruises' vessel when she arrived were some 700 passengers and a crew of 600. "Good trading and a great lunch (for the Pitcairners) was put on by the ship, and enjoyed by all who went on board from the Island," writes Pitcairn Brian Young who took this picture of the ship from one of Pitcairn's longboats. At three o'clock in the afternoon as the ship prepared to depart for Moorea, the islanders broke into the singing of their traditional farewell songs: the hymn, "In the Sweet Bye and Bye," and the Pitcairn "Goodbye Song." Crystal Symphony was launched in 1995, with a Bahamas registry. She is 782 feet in length, and has a beam of 99 feet.
  • January 12, 2014, RoRo ship Talisman
    The giant, 67,140-ton, roll on-roll off, vehicle-carrying ship Talisman was on its way from Panama to Auckland, New Zealand, and might well have been on a very tight schedule because it did not stop at Pitcairn, passing just one mile north of Adamstown. Though contacted by vhs radio while the ship was 20 miles from Pitcairn, she chose not to stop, though many of her sister ships of the Wilhelmsen line have been Pitcairn callers in the past. Talisman is 240 meters in length (about 787 feet) and has a beam of 32 meters (just over 104 feet), and has eight decks. The vessel was built in Korea in 2011, and has a Norwegian registry.
  • January 8, 2014, Cruise ship Marina
    The 66,084 ton cruise ship Marina, sailing from Easter Island to Tahiti, called at Pitcairn in the early morning hours with some 1,240 passengers and a crew of 800 on board. The sleek-looking vessel came to anchor off Pitcairn's Ginger Valley at just before 9 a.m., and although the ship's passengers were not allowed to come ashore because of moderately rough weather, the Pitcairners were allowed to come aboard the vessel and sale or trade their fine crafts and curios to the passengers. By all reports, it was a good sales day for the islanders , most of them coming ashore from the ship with empty bags, as one Pitcairner put it. At 3 p.m., Marina hoisted her hook and set her course northwestward for the isle of Tahiti. Built in 2011, the 785-foot long Marina has a beam of 105 feet, 11 guest decks, cruises at 20 knots, and has a Marshall Islands registry.
  • December 28, 2013, tug boat LEBU
    On December 28, 2013, at midday, the powerful, sea-going tug boat LEBU with five persons aboard made her appearance off Bounty Bay at Pitcairn Island. According to Island sources, LEBU is a brand new vessel, and was making its way from China to Chile in connection with its call at Pitcairn. LEBU is registered in Kingston, Jamaica. She anchored for two hours off the Island, but during that time no one from the vessel came ashore. In early afternoon LEBU took her departure from Pitcairn for Chile.
  • December 16, 2013, yacht Attila
    The sloop-rigged, 34-foot yacht Attila arrived at Pitcairn Island on December 16, 2013, after a voyage of some 70 days from Panama. Two people were on board the vessel which was flying the flag of Hungary. After a visit on the island and an overnight anchorage off the island, Attila departed for December 17 for Mangareva in the Gambier Islands group.
  • November 18, 2013, Yacht Tonga.
    In rough seas on November 18, the ultra-lite French yacht Tonga called at Pitcairn. The boat, with three persons on board, was moved to Tedside in Pitcairn's lee in an attempt to anchor there, but the seas were far too rough to safely anchor a vessel of this type which is made more for speed than for cruising, and if anchored in such as the seas were would likely be in serious trouble. After only a short period of time at Tedside, Tonga departed Pitcairn for an unknown destination.
  • November 17, 2013, Cruise ship Costa Neo Romantica.
    On November 17, 2013, the 57,100-ton Italian cruise ship Costa Neo Romantica called at Pitcairn. But call was all she did. Only six officials of Pitcairn Island were allowed on board the ship, a great disappointment to the islanders who were ready and hoping to sell their crafts and other items of interest on board the ship. There were more than 1,400 passengers and a crew of 622 crew members on the ship which arrived at 10 a.m. in good weather. A Pitcairn-crafted model of H.M.S. Bounty and a plaque were presented to the ship by Pitcairn officials. The Costa Neo Romantica's previous call before Pitcairn had been at Easter Island, and she was bound for Tahiti. Launched in 1993, this cruise ship is of Italian registry, has 11 decks, is 719 feet in length, with a beam of 105 feet, and ploughs the seas at 18.5 knots.
  • October 28, 2013, Super yacht Ohana.
    After what one passenger aboard described as "a horrendous six-day battle with headwinds" from Tahiti to Pitcairn Island, the 163-foot super yacht Ohana arrived off Bounty Bay on October 28, and went to anchor off The Rope. With a crew of nine and passengers for Pitcairn, the vessel made only a brief stop at the island before making sail in the evening of the 28th for Easter Island, and then proceeding on to Panama. Built in New Zealand in 2012, the 370 ton Ohana is described as "a magnificent vessel with capacity for accommodating 10 passengers." In addition to sail, the yacht is powered by a Caterpillar C32 ACERT (1400 BHP) engine, that allows her to achieve a maximum speed of 18 knots with a 12-knot average.
  • October 17, 2013, Sailing vessel Da Boat  -   October 17, 2013 Yacht Coccinelle.
    The French yacht Da Boat called at Pitcairn on October 17, anchoring in Bounty Bay after the more than 300-mile voyage from her last port of call.. The four persons on board the vessel came ashore to enjoy visiting various sites of interest on the island. Having come from Mangareva in the Gambier Islands, Da Boat made sail on October 19 for Easter Island, from which place she would proceed on to Chile in South America.

    The yacht Coccinelle, chartered out of Mangareva, arrived at Pitcairn on October 17. The vessel did a quick turn-around, carrying Pitcairners Brenda and Mike Christian and Meralda Warren to Mangareva from which point they took the once-a-week air flight to Papeete, Tahiti. In Tahiti the three islanders represented Pitcairn Island in a large Bounty Festival. Coccinelle's captain-owner left his wife and two children in Mangareva while he did the charter from Mangarreva to Pitcairn to Mangareva.
  • August 30, 2013, Sailing Yacht Polo Flat
    Flying the Australian flage, the 33-foot long steel-hulled yacht Polo Flat arrived in the morning at Pitcairn Island on August 30, 2013. Coming from Mangareva in the Gambier Islands with two persons on board, the yacht departed Pitcairn for Easter Island in the evening hours of her arrival day.
  • August 25, 2013, Cargo ship Marsgracht
    In good weather Spilethoff Bevrachtingskantoor's cargo ship Marsgracht, 11,759 deadweight tons, Captain O. Nikitchenko, hove to off Pitcairn at 10 a.m., on August 25, 2013. Shortly thereafter the Netherlands-registered vessel's crew came ashore in two lots to visit and trade on the island. "This ship traded well, with lots of dunnage (timber) and odd bits coming ashore from her," reported Pitcairner Brian Young. Marsgracht was built in China, with her first sea service coming in 2011. The vessel is 142 meters long, with a beam of 19 meters, and an average speed of 12.4 knots.
  • August 3, 2013, Dutch cargo ship Floretgracht
    Spliethoff Bevrachtingskantoor's cargo ship Floretgracht called at Pitcairn Island on August 3, 2013, for a visit of a few hours on her voyage from Geelong, Australia, to Ecuador. Under the command of M. Stepanov, Master, the ship's crew of eight came ashore for a brief visit on the island. Built in China in 2012, Floretgracht is 137 meters long, with a beam of 19 meters. Her deadweight tonnage is 12,067 tons.
  • July 20, 2013, Yacht Australie
    The French yacht Australie arrived at Pitcairn Island on July 20, 2013, from the Galapagos Islands with two persons on board. The yacht arrived in good weather, however, the weather turned bad overnight, and for the next four days the yacht had to be sheltered at Tedside hoping for a break in the weather. Finally, on July 25, with the weather still bad, the Australie uped anchor and left for Mangareva in the Gambier Islands.
  • July 12, 2013, Sailing yacht Wind Witch  -   July 19, 2013, Sailing catamaran Saraba.
    The American sailing yacht Wind Witch with one person aboard arrived at Pitcairn on July 12, and departed on July 14. Due to the weather & a strong south wind, the vessel's skipper never got ashore. His main engine was not working so he had to depend on his sail to move the yacht. Because the yacht was anchored close to the island, upon his departure the Pitcairners had to use one of their longboats to help him get his anchor up and to tow him to safe water away from the coast. The Wind Witch was 26 days sailing from the Galapagos Islands to Pitcairn, and the skipper departed Pitcairn for Tahiti for repairs.

    With three persons on board, the Brazilian 55-foot sailing catamaran Saraba arrived at Pitcairn Island on July 19 from the island of Mangareva in the Gambier Islands. The Saraba began her return to Mangareva on July 21.
  • June 29, 2013, Sailing yacht Chateau Beaumont  -   June 29, 2013, Sailing yacht Coccinelle
    The 70-foot yacht Chateau Beaumont (left) flying the French flag with a crew of three, arrived at Pitcairn from Mangareva in the Gambier Islands on June 29. Later in the day of her arrival (at about 4 p.m.), Chateau Beaumont departed for Henderson Island, one of the Pitcairn group of islands, with three Pitcairners aboard in addition to her crew. Before departing, "lots of cargo" was taken aboard the vessel to supply needs during a planned work project on Henderson.

    A 45-foot sailing vessel, calling at Pitcairn from the Galapagos Islands, Coccinelle arrived under the French flag. A family of four was aboard Coccinelle. They enjoyed an overnight visit at the island, and departed for Mangareva in the Gambier Islands at 3 p.m., on June 30.
  • May 23, 2013,Sailing yacht Sara Jane  -   May 24, Sailing yacht Sea Venture
    On May 23, the sailing yacht Sara Jane (left) called from Easter Island with three persons on board, a young boy and his parents. They came ashore for two days and then departed for Mangareva in the Gambier Islands on May 24.

    The Swedish-registered yacht Sea Venture (right) with six young Scandinavians on board - including Danish, Swedish and Norwegians - called on May 24 from the Galapagos Islands, and anchored first in "Rope." Alas, their anchor got stuck and they had to dive to get it untangled from the rocks. Later on they anchored in Bounty Bay in quite rough seas, but they persisted, traveling in and out from the island in an inflatable canoe when weather permitted. After a good visit with the Pitcairners, the young sailors on Sea Venture departed for Mangareva
  • May 16, 2013, super yacht Marie
    In the afternoon of May 16, the super yacht Marie, with eight persons on board, came to anchor off Bounty Bay. Sailing from Auckland, New Zealand, the Marie was bound for the Galapagos Islands. Because the sea in the bay was on the rough side, no one from the yacht came ashore. At dusk she upped-anchor and made to the east toward the Galapagos. Built in 2010, Marie is an American-owned aluminum-hull vessel of 180 feet in length.
  • April 27, 2013, French frigate Prairial (F731)
    On April 27, in rough seas and with 96 crew members on board, the French naval frigate Prairail called at Pitcairn Island from Easter Island, her last port of call. Because of the prevailing rough sea conditions, the vessel was brought to anchor at Tedside on the lee side of Pitcairn, and all crew members then came ashore to enjoy themselves. According to a Pitcairner, "A helicopter from the ship was flying around the island on both days the ship was here." A sumptuous Pitcairn dinner was served to the crew on shore on Saturday evening, and the Prairail's crew returned the favor with a barbeque lunch on Sunday before the ship departed Pitcairn for Mururoa Atoll at 4 p.m. The 2,590-ton Prairial is powered by four diesel engines that can speed her through the seas at 20 knots. Her length is 307 feet, with a beam of 14 feet. She was launched on March 16, 1991. Prairail's home port is Tahiti.
  • April 24, 2013, General cargo ship Dijksgracht
    In windy, rainy weather on April 24, the general cargo ship Dijksgracht hove to off Bounty Bay at Pitcairn Island, and the Pitcairners were welcomed aboard by Dijksgracht's Master, Douwe Hokwerda, to sell or trade their island products, crafts and curios. After having transited the Panama Canal, the 17,381-ton ship was bound for Auckland, New Zealand. Flying the flag of The Netherlands, Dijksgracth was built in 2008, has a length of 157 meters and a beam of 22 meters. "Trading was good," during the ship's three-hour stop at the island, said a Pitcairner.
  • April 17, 2013,Sailing Yacht Pacific Cool, and Sailing Yacht Hasta Luego
    With French Captain Jean Pierre and his partner on board on April 17, the sailing yacht Pacific Cool arrived off Pitcairn Island at the same time as did the sailing yacht Hasta Luego, both vessels arriving from the east, their last port of call before Pitcairn being the Galapagos Islands. Pacific Cool is an Armel 53, French-built vessel, "A very nice looking boat," said a Pitcairner. Captain Henry and one crew member were on board at the Hasta Luego's arrival off Bounty Bay. Both yachts departed Pitcairn for Mangareva island 310 miles to the west, late in the evening of April 18.
  • April 15, 2013, Catamaran My Muse
    After showing her colorful sails off Bounty Bay on the morning of April 15, the catamaran My Muse came to anchor and those on board came ashore to spend time on Pitcairn Island for several days. Those coming ashore were an unnamed husband and wife, two children, a crew member, and a dog. There was a bit of a mix-up about Pitcairn's laws as to whether dogs off calling vessels could come ashore, but that discussion took place after the dog was ashore. On the morning of April 19, My Muse lifted her sails for Mangareva in the Gambier Islands after her captain and crew having had a happy time at Pitcairn Island, home of the Bounty mutineers.
  • April 8, 2013, Yacht Nana and Catamaran Elsie
    On a voyage from Columbia, Latin America, to the Gambier Islands, the yacht Nana called at Pitcairn Island early in the morning of April 8. The vessel was anchored at Tedside in the lee of the island, and the Swedish couple on board came ashore to visit throughout the day. Nana set sail in the evening of the 8th , her course being for Mangareva in the Gambiers. Also on the 8th, the catamaran Elsie arrived at Pitcairn from an unknown earlier port of call. In "quite rough" seas Elsie also made anchorage at Tedside, and the vessel's occupants, an American couple with two children and a fifth person as crew, went ashore where they visited in the day, mostly in the Pitcairn Museum and at the Post Office. In company with the Nana, Elsie sailed to the west in the evening of April 8, looking for smoother waters.
  • April 7, 2013, The yacht Sauvage
    On a bell-clear day in early April the trim little yacht Sauvage called at Pitcairn Island. The vessel's last port of call before arriving at Pitcairn was Easter Island, and her destination after leaving the island was Mangareva in the Gambier Islands group. The Sauvage visited Pitcairn from April 7 until she sailed westward on April 11.
  • February 25, 2013, MV Dynamogracht
    The 17,967-ton general cargo ship Dynamogracht called briefly at Pitcairn Island on February 25, 2013. The Netherlands-registered ship last port of call before arriving at Pitcairn was Panama, and after leaving Pitcairn she was bound for Auckland, New Zealand. One of many Gracht ships that are always welcomed at Pitcairn Island, the Dynamogracht was built in 2010, and has a length of 157 meters and a beam of 23 meters. The ship is distinguished by her three large booms that speed the on and off-loading of cargo.
  • February 15, 2013, Pacific Princess
    Princess Cruises'30,277-ton cruise ship Pacific Princess called at Pitcairn Island on February 15, 2013, the latest of several annual visits this welcome visitor has made to the island. Built in France, the Bermuda-registered Princess cruises at 20 knots, measures 592 feet in length and has a crew of 373 to serve her hundreds of passengers who enjoy the many pleasures found on her 10 decks. The call of the Pacific Princess at Pitcairn Island is always a source of excitement and gladness among the Pitcairners every time she shows her sleek lines off Bounty Bay.
  • February 2, 2013, Arcadia
    Operated by P&O Cruises, Arcadia's call at Pitcairn island on February 2, came after she had called at Easter Island. Following her call at Pitcairn she was bound for Tahiti in the Marquesas Islands, north by northwest of Pitcairn. A beautiful, giant-size vessel of 86,799 gross tons, Arcadia's length is 951 feet, and her beam, side-to-side is 32 feet. She carries a crew of 976 to serve a maximum of 2,388 passengers. She was built by Fincantieri at their shipyard in Marghera, Italy, and is the third largest of seven ships currently in service with P&O Cruises. The ship officially entered service with the company in April 2005, and is an adult-only cruise ship.
  • January 15, 2013, Europa
    Hapag-Lloyd's beautiful 28,890-ton, 408-passenger cruise ship Europa is no stranger to the people of Pitcairn Island. She is a looked-forward-to friend every time she shows her sleek lines off Bounty Bay. Her call at Pitcairn on January 15, came following a call at Easter Island. After what a number of her passengers called "a joyful visit" at Pitcairn, Europa was bound for Tahiti in the Marquesas Islands. Launched in 1999, she is Hapag-Lloyd's upmarket flagship which primarily serves Europe's German-speaking travelers, but is also well known to a more global cruise audience. The storied guidebook Berlitz has long ranked Europa as its top-ranked cruise ship. In fact, she is the only vessel in the guide that has consistently merited a five-plus ranking (every year for more than a decade). The seven-deck Europa has a crew of 264, and is registered in the Bahamas.
  • January 3, 2013, Marina
    Marina called at Pitcairn from Easter Island. After her Pitcairn call she sailed for Tahiti in the Marquesas Islands. Sailing for the Ocean Cruises cruise ship company, the 66,084-ton, 789-foot-long Marina began her cruise ship life in May 2012. She is thought to be one of the most beautiful, eloquent and sophisticated ships to take to the sea in the past 50 years. Marina has 15 decks, a beam (side-to-side) of 106 feet, and cruises at 20 knots. Her guest capacity is1,250 passengers (double occupancy). Registered in the Marshall Islands, it is said of the Marina that her accommodations in every category "are incredibly spacious, especially with regard to the lavish bathrooms.".
  • December 25, 2012, Caledonian Sky
    The motor vessel Caledonian Sky (former names, Hebridean Spirit, Renaissance VI ) called at Pitcairn on Christmas day, 2012. Under the control of her Captain Newman, she had come from Easter Island to the east and was bound for Mangareva in French Polynesia which lies some 300 miles west by northwest from Pitcairn. The Sky is a handsome yacht style ship featuring lots of polished wood and providing a comfortable cruise experience in elegant surroundings. She is operated by Noble Caledonia, was built in 1991, and refitted in 2001. She is of 4,200 tons, accommodates 114 passengers and a crew of 74. The ship's officers are British.